Symptom Tests for Adults

ADD Test: Do I Have Inattentive ADHD?

Symptoms of ADD in adults can show up as lack of motivation, procrastination, and difficulty sustaining attention. Inattentive ADHD can cause problems with relationships, finances, and work. And it is absolutely worth diagnosing — and treating — at any age. Start with this free online ADD symptom test.

Do I Have ADD (aka Inattentive ADHD)?

Symptoms of inattentive attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD) — particularly in women — can go undiagnosed or misdiagnosed for years, even decades. Many adults are finally evaluated for ADD symptoms after their children get diagnosed — and they realize that they struggled with the same symptoms all their lives. ADD symptoms in adults can include lack of motivation, procrastination, and difficulty sustaining attention. ADD can cause problems with relationships, finances, and work. And it is absolutely worth diagnosing — and treating — at any age.

Only a mental-health professional can tell for sure whether symptoms are severe, frequent, and pervasive enough to suggest a positive ADD diagnosis. But this self-test may provide some behavior clues and suggestions about next steps.

This questionnaire is designed to determine whether you demonstrate symptoms similar to those of attention deficit disorder (ADD) — and the inattentive sub-type in particular. If you answer ‘Very Often’ or ‘Frequently’ to a significant number of these questions, consult a licensed mental health practitioner. An accurate diagnosis can only be made through clinical evaluation. This screener is based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), published by the American Psychiatric Association.

I start a chore or project at home and then move on to a different task, leaving many chores and projects partially complete. I have a variety of unfinished tasks laying around my house.

I procrastinate, especially when the project I need to do will require a sustained mental effort, such as paying bills, balancing the checking account, or doing taxes.

I forget doctor’s appointments, meetings for work, or plans with friends. I have been told that if it is important, I will remember, but that doesn’t seem to be true.

When involved in something that I find interesting, I may lose track of time or have a hard time pulling myself away, even when I have other obligations.

I am easily distracted by activity around me at work. I work better in quiet, private environments.

People in my life – parents, teachers, and bosses – describe me as an underachiever. They may say I lack drive, call me a couch potato, or say that I am lazy.

People complain that I don’t remember things they told me or that I don’t seem to listen when they talk to me.

I change jobs often — either because I become bored with the job or because I am fired due to tardiness or not completing tasks.

When given similar tasks at work, I take longer than my coworkers do to complete assignments.

My friends have told me an artificially early time for dinner reservations or lunch dates because I am always late.

My mind drifts when I am talking to someone, and I often find that I have missed parts of the conversation.

I have lost jobs because of chronic tardiness.

I get hit with late fees on my credit cards and/or utility payments more often than I would like to admit.

I seem unprepared because I forget or lose things like my keys, cell phone, and wallet.

My boss or coworkers have commented that I seem disinterested in the work I am doing and am often staring into space when I should be working.


(Optional) Would you like to receive your ADD symptom test results — plus more helpful resources — via email from ADDitude?

Can’t see the self-test questions above? Click here to open this test in a new window.


ADD in Adults: Next Steps

1. Take this Test: Full ADHD Symptom Test for Adults
2. Take This Test: ADHD Symptoms in Women and Girls
3. Take This Test: Do You Have Rejection Sensitive Dysphoria?
4. Take This Test: Do You Have Adult Autism?
5. Take This Test: Do You Have Emotional Hyperarousal?
6. ReadLearn About Inattentive ADHD in Everyday Life

4 Comments & Reviews

  1. Take your results on this test with a grain of salt. A number of these are come from the hyperactive section of the DSM V, not the inattentive section.

  2. I joined just to mention that this is article/test is completely wrong. As whyworrylane pointed out, many questions come from the hyperactive section of the DSM. In fact, the majority of the questions apply specifically to hyperactive presentation, and I wouldn’t be surprised if this was a simple mixup. I find it hard to believe that a doctor reviewed this at all. If I took this test before my diagnosis, I might not get the help I need.

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