Symptom Tests

[Self-Test] Could You Have Rejection Sensitive Dysphoria?

Rejection sensitive dysphoria, or the extreme emotional pain linked to feelings of rejection and shame, commonly affects children and adults with ADHD. Use this self-test to determine if your symptoms match those of RSD.

Reviewed on October 30, 2018

Reviewed by William Dodson, M.D., a member of ADDitude’s ADHD Specialists Panel.

What Does Rejection Sensitive Dysphoria Look Like in People with ADHD?

Rejection sensitive dysphoria (RSD) is an intense emotional response caused by the perception that you have disappointed others in your life and that, because of that disappointment, they have withdrawn their love, approval, or respect. The same painful reaction can occur when you fail or fall short of your rather high goals and expectations. RSD commonly occurs with ADHD, and causes extreme emotional pain that plagues both children and adults — even when no actual rejection has taken place.

RSD is difficult for people with ADHD to describe, but all who have it agree that it feels awful. Indeed, the term dysphoria is literally Greek for “unbearable.” Often those with RSD hide these intense emotional reactions from other people, and feel ashamed of their vulnerability. The condition often triggers a profound and wide-reaching sense of failure, as though the person with RSD hasn’t measured up to personal or external expectations.

Could RSD be the cause of your strong emotional responses? Take the results of this self-test to a trained ADHD professional to discuss your options for managing symptoms.

Adapted from the work and presentations of William Dodson, M.D. Not a diagnostic tool. If you have concerns about possible RSD, see a mental health professional. An accurate diagnosis can only be made through clinical evaluation. Screener for personal use only.


Can’t see the self-test questions above? Click here to open this test in a new window.


What To Do Next:

1. Take This Test: Do I Have ADHD?
2. Take This Test: Do I Have Symptoms of Depression?
3. Learn More About Rejection Sensitive Dysphoria
4. Download Understanding Rejection Sensitive Dysphoria
5. Watch the Free Webinar “Emotions and ADHD: What Clinicians Need to Know”
6. Read the ADDitude eBook “9 Conditions Often Diagnosed with ADHD”

9 Related Links

  1. Greetings, ADDitutde crew!
    I’d like to take these self-tests, but there seems to be some kind of a problem – I cannot see the actual tests! There’s a couple of paragraphs about the test, and what to do with your results; about 5 inches of blank space, and “Jump to Comments” – No Test!

  2. I didn’t know this was a thing. I scored 100% and as I was reading the questions I started crying because of how accurately each one described me. I never would have thought to link these oddities about myself with my ADHD.

  3. This whole thing makes me so angry. I scored 65, 86, and 93 on the tests I took. Yes, I already knew I had these problems, and I’m not young so I’m more than familiar with how these scores manifest in my life. People don’t like me. I’ve had a miserable lifetime of trying to make relationships with others work, and I finally just decided to stay home where the pain is at least a bit less. I’ve been fired from every job except one I’ve ever had. I get to sit by and watch all my brothers and sisters do well, have nice jobs, buy homes, and all of them have happy marriages of 40, 30, 25 years. I can’t stand for someone to walk up behind me and throw their arms around me. You think I can sustain a marriage? I barely survive, and my family – i don’t have any friends – all think I’m just a loser, but at the same time all of them severely envy my creativity and talent. Oh, I want to deck someone. My house is a mess. I cannot get organized no matter how hard I try. NO ONE could possibly try any harder than me to fix themselves, and I can’t. Also, there is ZERO help. To get help, you need money. What a joke. I can’t afford food, but my tiny little disability check is 200.00 too rich to get food stamps. My whole life I’m crying inside for help. Believe me, there’s no help. If all this is wrong with you, people won’t like you, you won’t be able to earn a living, and absolutely no one will believe there is anything wrong with you. Yes, I’ve had a lifetime of seeking help from therapists, psychiatrists – they are the only people who have ever actually taken me seriously or tried to help. Yes, I take meds for my ADD and depression. Meds only do so much good, and to get constant help and support from the professionals, you need money, which you can’t possibly get when you have this much wrong with you while at the same time appearing normal to the outside world. DO NOT have these problems if you can possibly wave a magic wand and recreate a normal reality for yourself.

    1. That sounds really tough. I wish I could give you advice but I believe you when you say that you’re trying absolutely everything to help yourself and you’re 100% right that there’s not nearly enough help available. So all I can say is that I’m really sorry this is happening to you, and you’re very right to be angry, and I really hope that somehow things improve for you in the future. You deserve better; we all do.

    2. 68, 94, 100. And I took the ‘normal’ answer for several on that first one that I probably should have been more honest about. Point being, I know EXACTLY how you feel. Except I don’t even get disability. I’m trying to raise my 2 youngest boys with no job bc my car is down and I don’t have anyone to help fix it. The ONE person I did trust enough to work on totally screwed me. So the car and myself are both even more screwed than before he got ahold of it. The only other significant difference between us is that most everyone loves me. For the same reason that a lot don’t anymore: Unwavering honesty. I try not to be brutal with it if I can help it but that does happen at times as well. I’ve isolated myself for the most part. As you stated, it’s easier. I want to thank you for your comment. I cried when I read it. Alot. Then I registered on here for the sole purpose of saying thank you and letting you know that you’re most definitely not alone in those feelings. I honestly hate myself most days. I don’t know how anyone else can ever want to be around me. That’s the worst part I think. I have isolated myself from everyone. I only talk to a handful of people at all now. But I can’t get away from the person I need a break from the very most. The one reprieve that may actually give me a chance to relax and reboot- ME!

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