Working With a Reading Disability

1. GET EVALUATED > Not all reading problems are the same. A learning specialist or a specialized psychologist should evaluate yours. Be sure the professional uses a checklist (a Connors CBRS, say) to look for broad learning issues, and evaluates you based on those results. 2. IMPROVE COMPREHENSION >Read subtitles first-this will bring meaning to […]

1. GET EVALUATED

> Not all reading problems are the same. A learning specialist or a specialized psychologist should evaluate yours. Be sure the professional uses a checklist (a Connors CBRS, say) to look for broad learning issues, and evaluates you based on those results.

2. IMPROVE COMPREHENSION

>Read subtitles first-this will bring meaning to the text below them.

>Highlight the “$10 words” in each subtitle and the rest of the text. Pretend that highlighting a word will cost you $10. This forces you to make decisions about what is important. There is no rule about what to highlight, just keep it to a minimum – perhaps one or two “$10 words” per paragraph.

> Jot down a word or two in the margins or on a Post-It to remind you of the important things in each section. When you finish, review those words, along with your highlighted ones, to recall the content better.

3. USE TECHNOLOGY

>Use an app that has text-to-speech features, like Web Reader HD. Following the text while listening to it will strengthen your comprehension and your reading skills.

>Try a reading pen. An electronic pen (Wizcom is one) will read aloud the words in a memo or report as you trace over them. The pens also define words.

-Margaret Foster, M.A., learning specialist

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