Webinars & Podcasts

“Raising Socially Smart Tweens & Teens” with ADHD Dude Ryan Wexelblatt [Video Replay and Podcast #390]

Access the video replay, listen to the podcast episode (#390), download the slide presentation, and learn how to get a certificate of attendance for this ADHD Experts webinar originally broadcast on March 2, 2022.

Episode Description

When kids with ADHD struggle socially, people often assume they are “missing social cues.” In truth, many kids and adolescents struggle due to lagging social executive function skills.

Social executive function skills power the “operating system” of social interactions. Thus, if your child struggles socially, we can be relatively sure they have lagging social executive function skills. This webinar will provide you with an understanding of the social executive function skills that cause the most trouble for kids with ADHD, why parents have the most important role in helping their child to improve social executive function skills, and what works and does not work to help build these skills.

In this webinar, you will learn the following:

  • How to recognize lagging social executive function skills in your child
  • How to differentiate social anxiety from lagging social executive function skills
  • What exercises and activities bolster social EFs in children and teens with ADHD
  • What hurts, rather than helps, kids’ social skills
  • How to guide without helicoptering as your child focuses on social EFs

Watch the Video Replay

Enter your email address in the box above labeled “Video Replay + Slide Access” to watch the video replay (closed captions available) and download the slide presentation.

Download or Stream the Podcast Audio

Click the play button below to listen to this episode directly in your browser, click the symbol to download to listen later, or open in your podcasts app: Apple Podcasts; Google Podcasts; Stitcher; Spotify; Amazon Music; iHeartRADIO.

More on Social Skills

Obtain a Certificate of Attendance

If you attended the live webinar on March 2, 2022, watched the video replay, or listened to the podcast, you may purchase a certificate of attendance option (cost: $10). Note: ADDitude does not offer CEU credits. Click here to purchase the certificate of attendance option »


Meet the Expert Speaker

Ryan Wexelblatt, LCSW, is the director of ADHD Dude, based in Ventnor, New Jersey. Ryan has been learning and refining his approach to teaching social skills to kids with ADHD for more than 10 years. He creates videos for parents and kids at the ADHD Dude YouTube channel.


Listener Testimonials

“We just ‘discovered’ Ryan and found his approach to be what was missing in our understanding of ADHD and our parenting strategies. This was really well done.”

“Excellent perspective and details from this speaker.”

“I was truly helped by the webinar. It confirmed some things that my husband and I are doing right with our 16-year-old son, and some opportunities for us to do some things better.”


Webinar Sponsor

The sponsor of this ADDitude webinar is….

Play Attention: Enhance brain health and performance. For over 25 years PLAY ATTENTION has been helping children and adults thrive and succeed at school, home, and work. Our NASA inspired technology and cognitive training courses improve executive function and self-regulation. Each program includes a Lifetime Membership and a Personal Executive Function Coach to customize your program along the way. Click here to schedule your free 1:1 consultation to discuss a customized executive function training course for you! Call 828-676-2240 | www.playattention.com

ADDitude thanks our sponsors for supporting our webinars. Sponsorship has no influence on speaker selection or webinar content.


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1 Comments & Reviews

  1. I’m concerned about the idea of “fake outs” as healthy behavior. ADHD adults are exceptionally prone to saying yes too often to commitments that are not a good use of their time, and can lead to wasted energy, burnout, and disappointing the person you are trying to please as well as your more appropriate commitments (work, family etc.) because you’ve taken on too much and struggle with prioritizing. It’s also why ADHD adults and kids both are prone to following around popular, charismatic people at the expensive of people who treat them better: the tendency to people-please, maybe because of lack of self-esteem or simply because the charismatic person keeps asking for more. Teaching kids that lying about your interests is a good way to make friends seems like it will simply make these problems worse in adulthood.

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