Webinars & Podcasts

“Having the Talk: How to Best Explain ADHD to Your Child, Family, and Friends” [Video Replay & Podcast #265]

Access the video replay, listen to the podcast episode (#265), download the slide presentation, and learn how to get a certificate of attendance for this ADHD Experts webinar originally broadcast on October 10, 2019.

Episode Description

Part 2 of ADDitude’s 3-part ADHD Awareness Month Webinar Series

When a child receives an ADHD diagnosis, they often take home a prescription for medication, maybe a handout titled “What Is ADHD?”, and that’s it. Rarely do they get a clear, fact-based explanation of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. As a result, many kids — and parents — feel unnecessarily ashamed of the diagnosis.

ADHD Awareness Month is a perfect time to address this prevalent and persistent problem. The gains to a child’s self-esteem and self-understanding are huge when a caregiver works to gain deep knowledge and insight about attention deficit disorder (ADHD) — and the words to explain it effectively to a child, family members, and friends. Helping your child explain his own ADHD to peers and teachers is empowering and the most effective form of self-advocacy.

In this webinar you will learn from Ryan Wexelblatt, LCSW, about:

  • How to help kids at various ages explain their ADHD diagnoses to peers
  • How parents can explain the condition to extended family members and friends who may see ADHD as a “character flaw”
  • How to explain ADHD specifically to fathers who may not believe in the diagnosis or think that their child’s ADHD behaviors are intentional
  • The downside of “sugarcoating” ADHD by calling it a “superpower” or “gift”

Watch the Video Replay

Enter your email address in the box above labeled “Video Replay + Slide Access” to watch the video replay (closed captions available) and download the slide presentation.

Download or Stream the Podcast Audio

Click the play button below to listen to this episode directly in your browser, click the symbol to download to listen later, or open in your podcasts app: Apple Podcasts; Google Podcasts; Stitcher; SpotifyiHeartRADIO.

Read More on How to Explain ADHD to Kids and Teens

Obtain a Certificate of Attendance

If you attended the live webinar on October 29, 2019, watched the video replay, or listened to the podcast, you may get a certificate of attendance option. Note: ADDitude does not offer CEU credits. Click here to get the certificate of attendance option »

Meet the Expert Speaker

Ryan Wexelblatt, LCSW, is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker, certified School Social Worker and the creator of the ADHD Dude YouTube channel and Facebook group.  Ryan specializes in working with boys diagnosed with ADHD and their families.  He provides coaching through ADHD Dude Coaching and is the Director of Ride the Wave Counseling and Summer Trip Camp in Margate, New Jersey.  Ryan also creates content for ADDitude Magazine’s ADHD in Boys section.  Ryan’s videos for kids can be found under the Dudes Learn Social playlist of the ADHD Dude YouTube channel. | See expert’s full bio »


Listener Testimonials

  • “Such great practical info on how to explain ADHD to kids and also other adults…brilliant pointers!”
  • “Thank you for having Ryan speak. He is wonderful and spot on. His perspective with boys and ADHD has been very valuable.”
  • “I really appreciate having multiple ways to envision and explain ADHD with different ages and social relationships in mind.”

Follow ADDitude’s full ADHD Experts Podcast in your podcasts app:
Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | Spotify | Google Play | Pocket Casts | iHeartRADIO | Stitcher

1 Comments & Reviews

  1. “How to explain ADHD specifically to fathers who may not believe in the diagnosis or think that their child’s ADHD behaviors are intentional”… I needed this 22 years ago when my daughter was diagnosed. My husband was so afraid of our daughter being “labeled” in school. Oh how I wish I had been more insistent! At 27 years old her anger is out of control. Her anxiety is controlling her life. I know now that she needed to medicated at 5 years old to help her get control of how to process everything coming at her. It breaks my heart to see her so unhappy. She’s seeing a therapist and is on ADHD meds now, but it’s been such a struggle.

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