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“From Black-and-White to Technicolor: My Clarifying ADHD Diagnosis”

Following my late ADHD diagnosis, I heard echoes, over and over again, of the good witch Glinda from The Wizard of Oz saying, “You’ve always had the power, my dear, you just had to learn it for yourself.”

I always knew that there was something different about me. I have extremely high energy. All my life, teachers, friends, and business colleagues have told me to slow down and take a breath.

In my early 40s, a mentor hinted that I might have ADHD. A decade later, a friend blurted out, “I think you have ADHD!” Still, I dismissed it.

It wasn’t until a few years later, in the throes of menopause, that I really started to struggle. I was certain that I had early-onset dementia. I met with a psychologist. When she diagnosed me with ADHD, I asked her if she needed to interview my husband to get more insight about my behaviors. She laughed and said, “No, it’s definitely ADHD!”

[Take This Test: Do I Have ADHD? Symptoms in Adults]

I felt relief. I felt like Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz when the screen shifts from black-and-white to technicolor. I had escaped.

How My ADHD Diagnosis Changed Me

After being diagnosed with ADHD, I stopped saying yes to everything. I learned to pause and take a moment to consider what I really wanted. I gave myself permission to learn how my brain works, and now I know why I do what I do.

My work has always consisted of inspiring, connecting, and helping others. I spent a decade as a Weight Watchers group leader when my kids were little. When they were in grade school, I became the CEO and co-founder of The CUREchief Foundation, Inc., where I was responsible for hundreds of volunteers around the country.

I used to obsess about whether I was doing the right things in the right way. I was fixated on everyone liking me. Now I don’t care about anything other than being myself. I hear echoes, over and over again, of the good witch Glinda from The Wizard of Oz saying, “You’ve always had the power, my dear, you just had to learn it for yourself.”

Understand Myself with ADHD: Next Steps


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