Symptom Tests

[Screener] Auditory Processing Disorder in Children

This screener may help determine whether your child demonstrates symptoms similar to those of auditory processing disorder, which impacts oral communication and comprehension.

Reviewed by Lois Kam Heymann, M.A. CCC-SLP

Does your child need instructions written out and numbered? Does he mispronounce and mix up similar sounding words? Or easily forget names and titles?

These are all signs of auditory processing disorder (APD), a learning disability that impacts the brain’s ability to filter and interpret sounds. People with APD have a hard time receiving, organizing, and using auditory information. They’re able to hear, but fall short at listening. While APD isn’t as well known as some other learning disabilities, it’s estimated that roughly 7 percent of children have some type of auditory processing difficulty.

APD usually becomes apparent in the early grades, when children are expected to actively listen. A young child with sound discrimination problems may be fidgety at story time, overwhelmed in noisy settings, or mispronounce words. Older children with APD may have trouble reading because it involves the manipulation of sounds.

Answer the following questions to see if your child might be showing signs of APD and share the results with a professional for evaluation.

Adapted from the symptoms of APD as described by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. This is not a diagnostic tool. If you have concerns about possible APD see a health professional. An accurate diagnosis can only be made through clinical evaluation. This screener is for personal use only.

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