ADDitude ADHD Experts Podcast

Listen to “A Parent’s Guide to Advocating Objectively at School When Behavior Impedes Learning” with Rachel Schwartz, Ph.D., BCBA-D

Tune in as Rachel Schwartz, Ph.D., BCBA-D, informs parents what to expect from a functional behavior assessment and how to advocate for objective language in your child’s behavior intervention plan.

Boy writing in a notepad doing his school work spelling or homework
Boy writing in a notepad doing his school work spelling or homework

Listen to “A Parent’s Guide to Advocating Objectively at School When Behavior Impedes Learning” with Rachel Schwartz, Ph.D., BCBA-D

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Defiant. Controlling. Noncompliant. Difficult. These are some of the terms used by schools to describe the challenging behaviors of children diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), or emotional disorders (ED). Challenging behaviors such as aggression, emotional outbursts, and difficulties tolerating activities typically lead to the request for a functional behavior assessment and subsequent behavior intervention plan — a “roadmap” for teaching your child new, appropriate behaviors and skills. It’s important to note that the language used in those plans can affect how teachers and school professionals work with your child.

Unfortunately, many behavior plans use negative language to describe student behaviors. Language like “noncompliant” and “controlling” places the blame for the disruptive behavior solely on the child without acknowledging the surrounding environment, the child’s needs and abilities, or the reasons behind the specific behavior. Simply put, these words fail to describe what is actually happening or point toward a solution.

The need for a common, objective vocabulary is necessary. Shifting the language we use to describe challenging behavior from subjective to objective terms is the first step toward helping your child make real behavioral change.

Rachel Schwartz, Ph.D., BCBA-D, informs parents what to expect from a functional behavior assessment and how to advocate for objective language in your child’s behavior intervention plan.

Listener testimonials:

  • “Ms. Schwartz was highly engaging and knowledgeable. I felt better informed as a result of attending.”
  • “This was so helpful. I’ve never heard of an FBA. My child often gets reports of “bad” behavior. I love the practical advice on how to change that language to be objective and actionable.”
  • “This was fantastic as a behavior special education teacher.”
  • “Wow I wish she was in our school! She is so calm and clear! Loved this one.”
  • “Excellent webinar that explained how to begin processes to help a child get what they need.”
  • “Really good information. I look forward to sharing this information with our foster parents.”

Related recommended resources:

This ADHD Experts webinar was first broadcast live on July 23, 2020. ADDitude thanks our sponsors for supporting our webinars. Sponsorship has no influence on speaker selection or webinar content.

Interested in advertising in ADDitude’s ADHD Experts podcast? Email anne@newhopemedia.com.

Note on audio quality: This podcast is a recording of a webinar series. The audio has been captured from live conversations (sometimes over a telephone), not recorded in a studio. Register to participate in the live webinars at: additude.com/webinars/


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Updated on August 11, 2020

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