Uncle Dharma

My Forum Comments

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 24 total)
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  • in reply to: ODD – Is There Hope? #141655
    Uncle Dharma
    Participant

    I have ADD, and also a low tolerance of fools and immature people.
    Often, I just ignore nonsense and illogical stuff.

    Is this ODD?

    in reply to: Driving with ADHD (to medicate or not) #122336
    Uncle Dharma
    Participant

    I cannot talk when parking or reversing.
    Everyone else in the car has to be quiet, and I usually turn off the radio.

    in reply to: Working and ADHD #121766
    Uncle Dharma
    Participant

    I worked as a geologist, mostly in exploration.
    I think my ADD helped me to be able to see correlations that others could not.

    Handling numerical data is not my good point. I can handle graphic data much better.

    Can you print some data to a graph so it can be ‘seen’ better?

    Nowadays, my meds enable me to do this type of boring methodical work much better.

    in reply to: Rambling in interviews (jumbled thoughts) #121765
    Uncle Dharma
    Participant

    I have been interviewing for a few years.

    Take in notes, or at least the key points that you want to talk about. Do NOT read out a page full of notes!

    You can ask for the question to be repeated. The interviewer often rephrases the question – a small advantage to you.
    also, it gives you time to think and compose your answer.
    If the question does not make sense, or if it is ambiguous, ask for clarification.

    I have worked as a trainer, so sometimes I ‘present a training course on the topic’ Not a good idea.

    in reply to: Driving with ADHD (to medicate or not) #121763
    Uncle Dharma
    Participant

    My specialist told me that when I take my meds – dexamphetamine – and drive, I will be a much safe driver.

    Also, The police here can test for methamphetamine, but not dexamphetamine.
    This is because they are chemically different.

    I am not addicted to my meds. I have never been addicted to anything.

    in reply to: Lost in Despair, Husband Unemployed AGAIN #87040
    Uncle Dharma
    Participant

    This happens to me sometimes.
    At other times, former employers come looking to hire me again.
    The social security office have rated me in the worst category for unable to keep a job.

    For about 25 years, I have been working on computer contracts in a specialist area.
    Most co-workers are nerds and geeks who focus on the technical task and not the office politics.
    Many co-workers work non-standard hours, so me arriving late or working back late is their idea of normal.

    Other work that has suited me includes something where I face customers, where the interaction is only a few minutes long.
    Or as a trainer, where I shift into extrovert personality and we all have fun.

    Maybe a change of job could help.

    in reply to: Self-Sabotage & Loss of Motivation #85464
    Uncle Dharma
    Participant

    One psych I chatted with about my lack of motivation to get started, and also to finish up, suggested:
    – set one day to do project A
    – another day to do project B

    If you are in full-time employment, then set aside Tuesday evening to do your accounts, Wednesday evening to do another thing, and so on.

    A best selling author was interviewed recently. How did she work full-time and write a novel?
    She came home, sat down for one hour and wrote.
    Then, she changed out of her work clothes, started to organise dinner, and all the other stuff.
    The trick was that did not do anything that would distract her.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 1 month ago by Uncle Dharma.
    in reply to: Is it too late for help for me? #81951
    Uncle Dharma
    Participant

    I am 67 years young. Everyone assumes that I am 10 to 15 years younger than I am, and then say that I am young at heart and so on.

    My formal diagnosis was 10 year ago, and it helped me a lot.

    My solution is to have a routine that is forced upon you. By this I mean, a job or regular volunteer work. This gets you out and about and meeting people.

    Then I hope to be able to focus on the two books that I have in me.

    Sending hugs.

    in reply to: Dementia or ADD (An "older fella's question as I'm 68) #81950
    Uncle Dharma
    Participant

    Hi there Kangkung,
    I think that distractibility can get worse, or harder to manage.
    My short-term memory is dreadful, but I can recall stuff that I read years ago.
    Recently, I have noticed that I am finding it harder to remember some details.

    I am 67 years old and on meds for about 10 years. Currently I am divorced, and retired.
    I am looking for a job, and this is mainly to get into a routine again.
    With a partner, and with kids, you are focussed and in a routine whether you want to be or not. There are things that HAVE to be done.

    I enjoy being on my own, but the lack of focus is an issue.
    Recently, I joined a dementia research project. No feedback yet.

    in reply to: Am I ADHD, or am a just a bit different? #81945
    Uncle Dharma
    Participant

    Casper, I can relate to you situation.
    I was not diagnosed until late in life, so I managed to study and work for many years. To complete high school and two degrees I HAD to organise myself into a strict routine and timetable EVERY hour of every day.

    After diagnosis, I used dexamphetamine. This enabled me to focus and concentrate on one thing at a time. The change was dramatic – my output as a programmer doubled. I was taking a tab every every 3 hours, and by about 3 1/2 hours I noticed that I was starting to daydream. It really was that noticeable.

    NOTE that one change in my behaviour was that due to the focus on boring stuff and less day dreaming, that I was not as creative. So I did not use dex after work, and not on weekends.

    A lot of people worry that an amphetamine is addictive. Not with me. I have to set an alarm to remind me to take it.

    in reply to: Has anyone held their child back a grade #81742
    Uncle Dharma
    Participant

    Two issues here, at least for where I live.
    1 – The schools do not like a student to repeat a year even if the student has not learned the basics that are needed for the next year. Not sure of their reasons.
    Some teachers are upset that they have to teach the curriculum for that year level, even though a few students have no basic skills to build on. That subject for that year then becomes a waste of time for those few students.

    2 – Individual teachers can give whacko advice.
    One teacher told me that to repeat a year at high school would be the loss of a whole year’s wages. I am not making this up! I repeated to get more subjects at the higher level, then went onto university and did a science degree. Later I moved into computing and also training.
    These days, I can earn a very high wage, much above the average.
    Due to studying part-time and going to university, I was 29 years old before I earned a whole year’s full-time wage. No regrets here.

    2.1 – The careers adviser at my high school told me that I would not make a good teacher and suggested other options. I have been running training courses for adults in the workplace for 30 years, and occasional guest lecturer classes at high school for about 5 years. The school students ask for me to join them on excursions. I really think that my ADD view of the world helped me to develop good class notes and exercises.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 2 months ago by Uncle Dharma.
    in reply to: What are your favorite traits that ADHD has given you? #70936
    Uncle Dharma
    Participant

    Chatting with a psychologist recently, I did an IQ test.
    I scored 135+ which is a lot higher than previous tests.
    The psych just said “that seems correct”
    When I mentioned the change from previous test scores, she said I was probably relaxed and able to focus properly.

    in reply to: Stay at home moms and procrastination #58873
    Uncle Dharma
    Participant

    I am still working on this, but I have some ideas that have worked in the past.
    Get into a daily routine. I am trying to go for a walk every morning, then start my day. This works when I have a walk as I am then awake and have planned my day.

    Have a weekly timetable with a main activity for each day.
    Maybe go to library then shopping on Monday, do all laundry and house cleaning on Wednesday. The idea is that you can look forward to Thursdays when you do gardening.

    My calendar is like a poster and in a place where I cannot miss seeing it, such as above my chest of drawers in my bedroom.
    Also, my calendar has several months at a time on display. This avoids turning to a new page and finding out that you missed something on day one.

    In the past, I have lived with other people and they get me going. At least get me up to join them for breakfast and so on.
    A psychologist friend suggested that as soon as I wake up, I put on music. Something that is lively and motivating.

    Don’t waste time online and ‘screen sucking’. I put on a music CD and when it stops, I logoff and start the next task.

    in reply to: What are your favorite traits that ADHD has given you? #55809
    Uncle Dharma
    Participant

    Creativity and inventing things, especially if it an item that I can build or adapt or repair or improve.
    When working as a demonstrator in a hardware store, I knew how to do everything – almost.

    I can visualize everything, and I can draw it in 3D.
    When working as a geologist, I would ‘read’ the landscape, then draw the structures in 3D.

    I am a problem-solver, think laterally, and have a zillion ideas.
    I am interested in just about everything.
    … After a fire at our house, the cleaner said that she had never seen a study with such a large range of topics on the bookshelves. Other people are so boring!

    I enjoy improving a process so that I can work faster and better. But when I get moved for being “annoying” or something, I have often been replaced by two workers. And the manager still thought I was not productive, but kept using my improved process!

    Keeping calm was good when I worked as an orderly in a busy operating theatre in hospital. Sometimes replacing freaked out nurses.

    in reply to: What are your favorite traits that ADHD has given you? #55791
    Uncle Dharma
    Participant

    I remain calm in an emergency.
    Sometimes this can be a personality thing, as my son and my father also step forward and help but neither have ADD.
    At work, I have been a fire warden for about 25 years.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 24 total)