sandman2

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  • in reply to: ADHD meds and athletic performance #80664
    sandman2
    Participant

    First there are new studies that show that a combination of stim meds and therapy allow for smaller amounts of stim meds to be given and the effectiveness is just as good.
    Second, as another poster has stated, the meds can be tailored to the situation. There are short acting and long acting meds. He can take a short acting one and have it out of his system by 1 or 2 in the afternoon.
    And, I agree with ADHDMomma, if it affects his concentration it is too high a dose.
    Fourth, the sport does make a difference. I wish you had said which sport he was into. for example, I think that in something like Baseball, the meds would be very helpful. In Tennis, not as necessary, but really should not make much of a difference. However, in all cases, (as with all of these meds) it takes trial and error to hit the right amount.
    Finally, if he is really a good athletic – where do you want him to go to school? A state school or someplace like Stanford? He will need the meds to help him in school ( and to help prevent anxiety, depression, and self medication (vis-a-vie Phelps). The point being that school, and friends, and maybe even sports can be helped with meds. You just have to take the time and research to figure it out.
    But, most importantly, you need to make sure that he is aware what is going on and the reason for the medication (if you go that route).
    Hope this helps.

    in reply to: To Medicate or Not Medicate? #73329
    sandman2
    Participant

    I am not sure there is such a thing as “milder symptoms”. There is inattentive adhd which is many times described as milder because the child is not hyperactive. It is just as damaging to a child. Many times worse because it can go unnoticed and untreated. Also the age of the child or year is school is also important. Some kids because they are very intelligent can go through high school before the subject matter just gets too difficult. But that doesn’t mean that the anxiety or depression that often accompanies adhd is not there and slowly getting worse.
    I agree with all that was said above.

    sandman2
    Participant

    I am wondering if he hides his homework because his meds have worn off and it is difficult for him to concentrate. Does he try to do his homework right after school?

    Speaking of meds. I don’t understand your statement that he needs some several times a day. Concerta should be good for 8 to 10 hours if properly dosed. The other two are only given once a day typically. If you need to give the Concerta more then once a day, he may be underdosed. Have you tried a medication like Vyvanse? It is adderall based and thus stronger. It also lasts 10 to 12 hours and is much smoother as it releases. While we are on the subject. I do not like to give kids Risperdone! It is not recommended because of its side effects and especially at his age, they can be a problem. Look them up. If anxiety is a problem, then try something like Lexapro and Celexa. But really look into getting him (slowly) off of Risperdone. Intuniv has had lots of good reports. I would be curious to know what other meds he has been on. Hopefully not Prozac! Has he had the same prescribing doc the whole time? Anyway, have a talk with his doctor.

    Finally, the title of this is indicates you are wondering if he should be back at elementary school. Speaking as a former elementary and middle school teacher and elementary school principal I would say NO. Work with his teachers, the school and the special ed department. Also, ADDitude has lots of help ideas for home and school work. The adjustment to middle school is a big one, but it can be done. By the way… a foreign language is typically all vocabulary at this stage. You need to know the words he needs to know, and then its just practice. A little bit at a time. Learn along with him.

    Hope this helps. If you have any questions, please ask.

    in reply to: Behavioral Therapy Not Working #71721
    sandman2
    Participant

    The thing about behavioral therapy is that one size does not fit all. And yes, while it can be effective, it does not happen over night. The type of reward system you were suggested to use can work great for younger kids, but as the kids age – its not as effective. Your therapist needs to know it is not working and should then make adjustments. If the therapist can not make adjustments to this kind of “canned” approach, then I would look into other therapists. The other thing is that You need to be an active part in this therapy. Its what you do at home, how you react to him that is most important! For example there is a lot of material on the additudemag.com site that gives very practical ways to work with ADHD kids. A good example is this: https://www.additudemag.com/slideshows/anger-management-for-kids/?utm_source=eletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=December
    this is the kind of information you should be getting.

    in reply to: Does it sound like a ADHD for a toddler ? #69446
    sandman2
    Participant

    While I agree with all or almost all of the above statements. Two things bother me. The first is that he had some very scary events between 1 and 2 years old. The second is that “during the last 2 to 3 weeks he has changed a lot” ADHD does not just suddenly come on like that. My question would be, are there things in his home or school environment that is causing these problems? Specifically, with the recent change – what also changed in his normal routine? His sleep patterns are not that unusual for a young kid who perhaps has not had proper sleep training techniques. But, to me, the other things point to some outside factor besides adhd.

    in reply to: ADHD + Gifted = "Average"? #56932
    sandman2
    Participant

    There is nothing in the DSM criteria that speaks to the childs intelligence. What defines ADHD is symptoms and intelligence is never mentioned. In fact many people with ADHD are very intelligent. You need to find a good doctor that specializes in ADHD and have your child evaluated. Then walk into a meeting with a diagnosis from a doctor. If they ignore that – then the fun can begin. Check out this link. https://www.helpguide.org/articles/add-adhd/diagnosing-attention-deficit-disorder-adhd.htm#children

    in reply to: adhd fatigue #52713
    sandman2
    Participant

    You don’t have to “Wean” off stimulant meds like you would with say anxiety meds. They are out of your system pretty much by the end of the day. Adderall IR should last 4 to 6 hours per dose. Talk with your doc. If the med is working for you, you are getting 12 to 18 hours of coverage which is a lot. You can very easily have a smaller dose at the last one. Heck, you can stop completely or just take one. The only effect will be that you will go back to normal ADHD behavior on the off time.

    in reply to: adhd fatigue #52711
    sandman2
    Participant

    The problem with instant release is that it hits you all at once, while an XR give a smaller instant release and the trickles out the rest. As a result, it tends to be smoother. Vyvanse due to the way it is metabolized is even smoother. The same amount in an Adderall XR will last twice as long and Will have less effects then the 10. You can also get it in a 5mg XR.

    in reply to: adhd fatigue #52710
    sandman2
    Participant

    Ya, 30 to 70 is a huge jump! It should last for around 12 to maybe 14 hours. More would be a sign of an overdose.

    in reply to: adhd fatigue #52641
    sandman2
    Participant

    lisdexamfetamine is a great medication, but it sounds like you might be overdosed. Try cutting back a bit on the dosage (with your doctor’s permission) and see what happens. Also if you can get out and exercise after works, you will find benefits from that!

    in reply to: 8yo Daughter with ADHD #49986
    sandman2
    Participant

    The thing is you don’t overcome or conquer anxiety overnight. She has built that up over several years of going to school with ADD and not understanding why things were not working out. Her initial response to Concerta made sense, but it probably was not the correct dose. It seldom is the first time. And, by the way, it is very typical for kids to really try and hold it together during school time and then just crash when they get home.
    The problem with anti-anxiety meds is that they don’t treat the source of the anxiety (unless you have a serotonin deficiency which would be really, really noticeable).
    Finding the correct stimulant medication dosage is very important ( you don’t just stop after one try).
    Helping her to understand how ADD is effecting her and making sure her teachers understand.
    Finding a new psyc might also be a good idea.

    in reply to: How to handle discipline at school #49985
    sandman2
    Participant

    You are right. Breakfast can make a huge difference as well as a good nights sleep. And, the excitement or anxiety of a field trip may have wiped out the sleep option.
    So obviously, you do things a bit differently next time.
    I agree with the above. Another thing to try is a set of books aimed at the 4 to 7 age group that will still work with him. They are meant to be read aloud, many times. They will give you a vocabulary set and a set of actions that can be practiced and/or talked about. Two good examples are:
    Cool down and work through anger –
    https://www.amazon.com/Cool-Through-Anger-Learning-Along/dp/1575423464/ref=pd_sim_14_1?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=1575423464&pd_rd_r=RXAATQ6D5FSN7N2AWNQ4&pd_rd_w=OU5Bc&pd_rd_wg=tORE1&psc=1&refRID=RXAATQ6D5FSN7N2AWNQ4
    Hands are not for hitting –
    https://www.amazon.com/Hands-Hitting-Ages-Best-Behavior/dp/1575420775

    sandman2
    Participant

    I was in education for 37 years from teacher to principal. This is not about devaluing teachers. It is about teachers devaluing students. They needed to be fired. But, I do feel bad because it looks like somebody in that school dropped the ball. It never should have gotten to this point if the teachers were correctly informed about ADHD and its effects. And if they were, then they really needed to have been fired!

    in reply to: Consequences for Unsafe School Behavior #49613
    sandman2
    Participant

    If the anxiety disorder is happening mainly at school – then that probably is where the problem is. There is a good chance that he either has a learning disorder or something like ADD. That is what you want to treat – the cause of the anxiety.
    here is a good link on ADD –

    What Inattentive ADHD Looks Like In the (Not So) Wild

    in reply to: Learning Multiplication Tables #49304
    sandman2
    Participant

    Well, this is a pretty old post. But, just in case, as a former math teacher in 5th,6th, and 7th grade, my main advice would be to keep it short, simple, and fun.
    Games are great. Use flash cards – but only for a short period of time – one to three min. max. Work on just one set of numbers at a time, till they have it down and then go on to the next set. Use rewards only, No penalties for wrong answers. Use the flash cards at breakfast, in the car, in the bathroom, before tv or dinner, etc.
    There are memory advantages to seeing and then writing down the answers. So having a bunch of pages of speed tests is helpful. But I would only do it infrequently….maybe as a way to show progress.
    Remember this is just rote memory. Not looking for any kind of understanding. That is a whole different type of learning.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 30 total)