rgoodrich

My Forum Comments

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • in reply to: Alternative treatment #92375
    rgoodrich
    Participant

    Im a big proponent of alternative healing practices. If I had a nickel for every probiotic or other supplement I’ve taken I’d be rich.

    But I totally disagree when it comes to withholding medication from a child for a medical condition. Would you withhold medication if your son were diagnosed with diabetes because you didn’t want to treat the “symptoms?” Of course not. So why withhold proven treatments for a neurological condition? I wish fervently that I’d been prescribed ADHD medication as a child. My life would have been very, very different. Ask yourself if your son will thank you later on for denying him all of the benefits and success that come from treating the many symptoms of ADHD.

    in reply to: Adderall and caffeine or alchohol #85538
    rgoodrich
    Participant

    Hi Kriesa,
    Obviously everyone is different, but I quickly found that the combination of Adderall and my normal two cups of coffee in the morning made my heart practically jump out of my chest. I still drink plenty of coffee, but now I make decaf (water decaffeinated to avoid chemicals). I also used to enjoy a few glasses of red wine on Friday and Saturday evenings. Once I started Adderall, I’d wake up way more groggy and uncomfortable the next morning. Not really sick, but just not feeling well. Finally I gave it up except for the very occasional glass. Habits can be hard to break, but worth it if you feel better in the long run.
    Best of luck,
    Rebecca

    in reply to: Speech Issues #74126
    rgoodrich
    Participant

    I do this ALL the time! I’ve realized that it happens when mind mind is racing a mile a minute and I’m thinking ahead to what I want to say but I’m currently saying something different. I’ll conflate a couple of words or even a whole sentence so they end up sounding like gibberish. It’s embarrassing and I always hope that the person I’m speaking to thought they just didn’t hear me right.

    in reply to: Generic Adderall #70895
    rgoodrich
    Participant

    Thank you for posting this information! I had no idea that there were different generic manufacturers. I just pulled out my bottles and see that my first prescription for 10mg pills was made by Aurobindo. I had a difficult time finding the right dosage because I had such severe palpitations and headaches. I’m on my third bottle, which is now 7mg pills, and these are made by Teva. I have been perplexed because I feel very different on these pills. I’ve even wondered if I need to increase the dose. But maybe it’s because I’m not feeling the racing heart that I had come to associate with the Aurobindo medication. Obviously it’s worth paying attention to our responses to the different sources. Thanks again!

    in reply to: Share some venting re. ADD mishaps! #70448
    rgoodrich
    Participant

    This reminds me of a story that a friend of mine told, where she pulled up to the unloading area of the airport (in a very small town), got on the plane, then realized that her car was still parked in front of the airport.

    in reply to: Share some venting re. ADD mishaps! #69580
    rgoodrich
    Participant

    My memory has always been terrible, and since I got my diagnosis, I know why. This week I entered the post office and couldn’t remember my PO Box number. I knew the vicinity of my box, so I had to stealthily try my key in a couple of boxes until I found mine. I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve stood in front of my office door clicking my car key to unlock it.

    rgoodrich
    Participant

    Hi Ameliemur9. You’ve described classic gaslighting. You expressed how you felt and your boyfriend put all the blame on you for his decision to break up with you. Don’t take that blame. It was his choice, for good or ill. You are allowed to express how you are feeling.

    in reply to: The on/off switch #69417
    rgoodrich
    Participant

    I’m just like you! I’ve worked in law enforcement, farming, fishing, construction, lots of different retail jobs, etc. I eventually got an elementary teaching job and stayed with it for 8 years before I quit. A few years later I began teaching at the university level, and I’ve been in teaching for over 20 years now. I tell you that in order to agree with the advice from ADHD Momma, that the answer is in finding ways to “reinvent” your agriculture so that it stays fresh and interesting for you. Teaching is perfect for me because I propose and teach many different courses which require me to research new areas and subjects. I’ll bet you can do the same thing with your farm.

    in reply to: Undiagnosed but OMFG #69412
    rgoodrich
    Participant

    Hi Disgracejones,
    Do you happen to still have the link to the article about bipolar and ADHD?

    in reply to: Creativity and ADHD #69291
    rgoodrich
    Participant

    Hi Kelley,
    I completed an MFA in creative writing many years before I was diagnosed with Inattentive ADHD. I struggled terribly with both of the problems you describe. I was so sensitive to criticism that I’d go home and cry after every workshop. I’m still very sensitive to critical feedback, even though it’s necessary for writers. I’ve found that just knowing that Rejection Sensitive Dysphoria is a real thing has been enormously helpful. Now I don’t feel like there’s anything wrong with me. It’s just who I am.
    There’s so much “baggage” related to creative work. It helps to journal to get to the root of how you feel about your work. We all worry about failure, but there is a lot to fear about success as well. Try to remember that your work is part of you, but not entirely you. When your writing doesn’t work as well as you’d like, or you are criticized, it is the work that has failed, not you. Try to picture it as something small and entirely separate from yourself. I write in 15-30 minute increments. Sitting down for only 15 minutes doesn’t feel threatening or difficult. Once I’m in front of the computer I often I lose track of time and end up writing for an hour or more.
    Good luck!

    in reply to: Always screwing up #69290
    rgoodrich
    Participant

    I teach university courses, and several times I forgot to go to class on time. It was humiliating, not to mention very inconvenient to students. I’ve also missed meetings, appointments, you-name-it. I tried alarms on my phone, but I don’t like to carry my phone with me every minute. Lately I’ve started wearing an inexpensive fitness watch (think FitBit but much cheaper). I program it to vibrate five minutes before each class. It’s made a huge difference. I don’t worry or obsessively check the clock. I can also quickly program it to vibrate for appointments and meetings. I feel much more relaxed and confident about getting where I need to be.

    in reply to: I'm scared to go to the doctor #69287
    rgoodrich
    Participant

    I remember having the same worries after I’d gone through all of the testing and was awaiting the results. I needed a definitive diagnosis very badly, but I was terrified that the therapist would tell me that there was nothing wrong, it was all in my head, etc. It sounds irrational now, but it reflected my low-self esteem. Now I’d say trust your knowledge of yourself. If you know something is not right, get it checked out and find the answer. It may not be exactly the answer you are looking for, but it’s better than staying in a place of anxiety and uncertainty.

    in reply to: There's an app for that!?! Your favorites & why #69283
    rgoodrich
    Participant

    I know there are dozens of to-do apps, but the one I like best is Wunderlist. Super easy to use. Sends reminders to email. I can manage projects by creating lists with subtasks, add files, or create repeating tasks.

    in reply to: Workplace emotions and impulse #66768
    rgoodrich
    Participant

    I had a similar experience lately. As a result of my newfound confidence and energy (thanks Adderall!) I took initiative and gathered some information from the chair of another department at our university with the idea of passing it along to my supervisor. Long story short–she was incensed that I had overstepped my bounds, not my role, yadda, yadda. I was humiliated in front of colleagues that I respect. It really affected my nervous system; my stomach was in knots and I couldn’t breathe for a few days.

    I have been able to process the experience and realize that I didn’t do anything wrong, but it’s hard to fully accept that when your central nervous system is still on high-alert. I’ve come to realize it’s a balancing act. We don’t want to act impulsively or inappropriately, yet we can’t stay locked in our offices, always afraid to make waves. I have decided that whenever I have a “great” idea that’s a little out of the ordinary, I’m going to either run it by someone else to get a second opinion, or at least sit on it for a day or two before I act.

    in reply to: ADHD–Lacking benefit from modern ideas/tips #66767
    rgoodrich
    Participant

    Hi belikewater:
    Can you tell us what dose of phosphatidylserine worked for you?

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)