random_outlaw

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  • in reply to: Dealing with other Parents who don't understand #67130
    random_outlaw
    Participant

    Hi ChasingDawn! As I suspected, there is an app for that: Money 1.0 . Take a look and see if you think it would help her. I’m a huge advocate of better living through technology. If you need more help looking for electronic resources let me know.

    Would you say that she is a visual or tactile learner? Right Start Math is a full curriculum but they have a set of games that are played with cards and an abacus. The abacus was magic for me an my son. I did two years of this program and he LOVED the abacus and the games. There is a game called Corners that is really neat (although the cards are a pain to manage!).

    in reply to: Dealing with other Parents who don't understand #67122
    random_outlaw
    Participant

    We have literally had this exact same experience. We went to the university fellowship psychiatry program for a year and it sucked. We did get the same doctor for a year, but it was very much a “get ’em in, get ’em out” deal. They were also impossible to reach by phone. We had an emergency and couldn’t reach anyone at the clinic.

    Faced with a recent need for meds, I went with a private pay psychiatrist who said she suspected he had autism after talking to him for 10 minutes based on his answer to one question. I kid you not. I could just feel her leading up to me forking out who knows how much money for (yet another) assessment. I told her there was no way we could afford another assessment right now. The thing is (and I’m definitely not “afraid” of autism or anything like that) is that he’s been assessed both privately and by the school district for autism and both ended up agreeing with ADHD/Anxiety.

    So now, like you, we’re forking out for a private pay counselor once a week because the psychiatrist wants him in therapy and we need the meds. Even though we live in a big metro area, there are very few psychiatrists who treat adolescents (all private pay) so I can’t afford to burn a bridge with this one.

    I don’t think people neurotypical children understand how much we go through and how much it costs! In our case it’s been literally 10s of thousands. The thing is, I don’t care about the money. I just want my kid to be OK. So when people like the $%*#( principal at his school mess up his IEP and trigger panic attacks I get a little bit ticked off!

    in reply to: Dealing with other Parents who don't understand #67068
    random_outlaw
    Participant

    I really feel for you and your son – judgmental people are the worst! I’m getting a lot of judgement thrown at me by my son’s principal right now and I hate it and want to explode.

    As for your son’s future… I would give him some time to mature. Whether or not he does homework on his own is not an indicator of future success 🙂 . The important thing is to find and cultivate his talents.

    My son is a freshman in high school and is very talented in computer programming and mathematics. His stepdad and I have essentially encouraged him to embrace his talents and pass (as in pass the class) the rest. I have learned not to offer criticism and instead offer support. I have researched paths to college and nobody tells you this but the “kill yourself in HS-nail the SAT-apply to a million colleges” is no longer the only path to a university. My son is going to junior college for two years which only requires a basic skills test in order to attend. He will receive academic support in junior college and if he gets an associate’s degree he will be accepted into any state university with a full credit transfer. No SAT required. He’ll get extra time to hone his academic skills in a less stressful environment and can space out his classes over more than two years. Then he can get his bachelor’s degree.

    The fact that we have sat down as a family and discussed these issues and made a basic plan has given him so much confidence. He feels empowered and is eager to move on and get a job and a home of his own. Even if your kiddo is young it’s never too early to talk about interests, career options, and plans for the future.

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