qwerty

My Forum Comments

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  • in reply to: Benefits to being clinically diagnosed? #74977
    qwerty
    Participant

    If your husband wants you to be diagnosed, I’d think he’d be willing to talk (or email…) to your therapist. It might seem impossible to ask him, but if it is for your son’s health and future success (seeing his mother succeed means he can, too), I’d take a deep breath or 7 and follow up. If that really can’t happen, ask your therapist for another way to be evaluated. Even seek out a second opinion, like you would with a questionable physical health diagnosis.
    Learn and apply what tools might help you. Re-evaluate your opinion of medications at some point in the future (6 months, a year…)if you don’t feel like you’ve gotten “far enough”. (I do not want meds for myself because of potential side-effects that I’ve experienced with other related prescriptions.)

    in reply to: Diagnosis #73341
    qwerty
    Participant

    I was tested in 1st grade and again at 45. Never diagnosed. “They” keep telling me I have depression, yet I am one of the most optimistic people I know. Not a goody-two-shoes, just generally upbeat and proactive. I have, for the most part, given up on “being medicated” because I’ll be prescribed an antidepressant…which will make me gain weight without trying. This last time around, I was given an antidepressant while being “wheelchair-bound” after an acute illness. I was unable to exercise the weight away like previous attempts at figuring out what’s wrong with me. Try dealing with the typical distractions plus having to educate yourself through a health upheaval and gaining 75 pounds in a few months. (I used to enjoy shopping…)
    For now, I won’t pursue an ADD diagnosis. I’ve decided to educate myself with this website and all it has to offer, plus trying to exercise myself back to health.

    in reply to: What unfocused feels like? #73336
    qwerty
    Participant

    Listen to the webinar from today, 1/11/18 if you have not yet. One of the best ones I’ve heard from ADDitude… Seriously!
    Then tell yourself, “Squirrel!”

    in reply to: Struggling with ADHD as an adult. #67066
    qwerty
    Participant

    Hi. Yes it can get easier. This website has a lot of great info- dive right in. [Love ADDitude!] Have you consulted an ADHD counselor lately? (To help with career considerations/frustrations.) Is there a workforce Center nearby? How about a local Vocational Rehabilitation office? Even if you don’t qualify for services, they can help point you to other avenues of help…like job search clubs, state or college career exploration websites, etc. Ask public library staff, too. Are there any hospitals, clinics, or churches near you that have support groups? Not to overwhelm you with information, but there are resources out there, they just aren’t all super easy to trip over.
    You are not alone. It is great that you aren’t afraid to ask for help. My Dad was too stubborn to consider getting help voluntarily (ADD-like tendencies run in my family) and never did find real contentment.
    (That’s enough for now for me.)

    in reply to: Why couldn’t they have just told me? #58872
    qwerty
    Participant

    I got tested in the early 70’s. I didn’t know what for…until I was tested for ADD 3 years ago. The test material was almost identical 40 years later. What a waste of potential. What a horrible waste of $ trying to go to college- even though I knew I wasn’t ready for it. I’ll be paying off loans until I die… One of my ‘rents even had a degree in Psychology from a Big University. (I was still abused and neglected.) Maybe they felt none of it mattered since I got good grades. (I was too afraid of them to not get AAAAAAAAs.)
    Anyway, I don’t know why some parents err so badly. Delusion, messed-up pride, NIMBY (not in my back yard), fear of imperfection, $.

    Maybe this is why the great painters start to paint.

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