Pump2Duncan

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  • in reply to: High Calorie small quantity school lunch ideas, please #98161

    Pump2Duncan
    Participant

    I’m in a similar situation. I send a protein shake everyday. If your little one likes smoothies, those can be a great way to sneak in veggies – fruits can mask spinach and carrots. My guy seems to pick up on those so we haven’t been able to add anything but water and protein powder. LOL.

    Clif bars pack a protein punch. And I agree with Penny, full fat cheese products are great and kids usually love them. If you search on Amazon, I believe you can find nut free protein bars. I just found over the weekend a bar called the “Perfect Bar” that packs a ton of calories that my son LOVES that’s all-natural. Not sure if they make any “nut free” varieties, but it might be a good idea for an afterschool snack. They are a bit pricey though – so pricey I actually put my son’s name on the bars and made sure everybody knew they were ONLY for my son.

  • in reply to: Concerta brand name VS Generic Mallinckrodt Methylphenidate #92513

    Pump2Duncan
    Participant

    As Penny noted, Walgreens carries the generic equivalent “Actavis” (ALZA 27 – for the 27 mg tablet). I once had Walgreens attempt to fill my son’s prescription with the other brand because they were out of the Actavis brand and I refused the medication and had them order the Actavis brand – which they did.

    I’d try Walgreens. Walgreens also has an online portal which will let you know which brand they are filling with before you even get to the pharmacy so you can call them with any issues before going to the store for pick up.

  • in reply to: Lunch Accommodations Added to an IEP #92168

    Pump2Duncan
    Participant

    Exactly HeartsandSoul. I’m on a migraine preventative medication myself that suppresses my appetite and I can attest, it kind-of sucks to have to force yourself to eat. We were so excited when he actually outgrew some clothes his year! I always get a little worried before going to the doctor because there’s a piece of me that worries that the doctor might think I’m not feeding him properly.

    The milk/protein powder/ice shake is out. My son came home and reported that the shake just felt weird. I was hoping to get those extra calories/fat in with the milk. Oh well, we’re back to water/protein powder mix.

    He does report that the school hasn’t said a word to him about his shakes. He said all of a sudden they don’t seem to care. YAY!! He’s not aware of the behind the scenes work I do – school has the note from the doctor. So end result – SUCCESS!!!!

  • in reply to: Lunch Accommodations Added to an IEP #91946

    Pump2Duncan
    Participant

    The policy basically states that in order for the Students to participate fully in the strong academic program, they need a well balanced meal. If parents choose to send a home lunch, any item out of compliance with their policy will be confiscated and the student will earn demerits. Soda of any kind, full sugar juices, chips, candy of any kind, and cookies and cakes are specifically excluded.

    The shake comes into question because it falls into the “drink” category. My son has said they want the drinks to be in a clear container and the liquid to be see through if brought from home. So basically, water. I send the shake in an insulated thermal blender bottle. We do buy the powder form protein, and I mix it at home. This is 1) to prevent any messes at school; 2) if you’ve ever dealt with protein powder, you know it’s difficult to mix properly (little bit of a sensory issue, it needs to be smooth) and 3) my son is very conscious about how much artificial sugar he consumes, this powder form had less sugar per serving than the ready-to-serve bottles did like Boost or Ensure. Today, the shake was whole milk, mixed with protein powder and ice. Lunch was a turkey, mayo and cheese sandwich – baby carrots – leather fruit strip – and a Clif kids bar. The school hasn’t sent home a lunch menu, which is one of the reasons why I don’t purchase their lunch. My son is already throwing what I know he likes away 3/4th the time, why would I chance the other 1/4th by purchasing the unknown school lunch.

    My son also reports that kids think he is drinking chocolate milk and it’s not “fair”. And I think therein lays the problem the school really has. My son tells them it’s a protein drink to help with his weight. But I’m sure it’s difficult for them to enforce such a strict policy when one kid is drinking what kids think is “chocolate” milk.

    If he doesn’t get the shake at school, nothing happens immediately. But due to the extended school day, he’s lost a meal’s worth of calories — and after awhile that adds up. Before the shakes, he had fallen off the growth chart. With the shakes, he got back on the growth chart. When he’s at school from 7:30 – 5:00 (including bus time) Monday-Friday, I simply can’t supplement enough extra calories at home.

  • in reply to: Lunch Accommodations Added to an IEP #91770

    Pump2Duncan
    Participant

    I semi-understand where the school is coming from, I know the INTENT of their policy comes from a well meaning place. Pizza is one of my son’s all time favorite foods. Even family members have commented to me (and him) when he reaches in the box for his 4th slice. “Don’t you think he’s had enough?” “Slow down, you’ve had enough.” I’ve educated these people on what is “healthy” for him, isn’t healthy for everyone. Extra butter, extra sour cream, extra extra extra — that’s healthy for him. And he’s still only in the 4th percentile (he fell off without the protein shakes). These same people will comment on how skinny he is. So it’s kind-of like, damned if you do – damned if you don’t.

    Since lunch time is one of the only times he gets to socialize, I absolutely do not want to isolate him further by forcing him to eat separate from other students – I absolutely will not allow that. His doctor says this is a common issue with ADHD children on a stimulant medication and so long as we maintain the slow incremental growth he has been managing, he would rather not make food an issue as much as possible. At home, it’s sit down meals with no distractions – protein and veggies first- followed by whatever starch is on the menu and I try to sneak in extra real butter or coconut oil onto his plate.

    I guess if I’m honest, that’s what bothers me the most. Why is this an issue now too? Why can’t anything be easy for this kid? Why does he have to be questioned about even his lunch on his second day of school? Seriously, can’t they at least give this kid his lunch break? When I got the text from the teacher just saying “have concerns about your sons protein shake” I seriously asked him if he was playing, sharing or making a mess with it at school. I couldn’t believe it when they said it wasn’t allowed.

    I guess in a society where everyone is so focused on healthy eating, we’ve forgotten that there’s different standards for different people.

  • in reply to: Lunch Accommodations Added to an IEP #91735

    Pump2Duncan
    Participant

    If he went to a school with a normal school day, I would just prepare a shake for after school; however, his school day is from 7:30 – 4:30, and by the time he gets home from the bus, it’s 5:00 and that’s pretty much time for dinner. Extended school day for their academic program. Their academic program and consistent-never-changing routine are hands-down amazing.

  • in reply to: Lunch Accommodations Added to an IEP #91701

    Pump2Duncan
    Participant

    I understand where the school is coming from …. in part. YES – some kids need to eat healthier, and IF a parent is sending nothing but oreos and chips, well okay. However, what is healthy for one child – may not be healthy for another. Just like I wouldn’t send my older son with the same protein shake I send this son. For my older son, it’s TOO many calories. What exactly is unhealthy about a protein shake with an apple, spinach, carrot and pinapple mixed in, and then a clif bar, half a sandwich and an all natural organic fruit leather in a hope he’ll get some solids?

    I’ve let the school know I’ll be sending the shake daily until his doctor’s appointment and will comply with their request; however, have also let them know that the doctor’s note will extend past just the shake and encompass his diet plan in it’s entirety. I’ve also requested an IEP review.

    Son reports they shortened the lunch period to 20 minutes, and he is able to get a Clif bar down and part of his sandwich, but did admit he’s still throwing a lot of it away. But does drink his shake since he said he can drink and talk easier.

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 9 months ago by  Pump2Duncan.
  • in reply to: Managing High Stress/Organized Kid Activities with ADHD #79413

    Pump2Duncan
    Participant

    You are SO not alone! Cheer, dance, etc. etc. etc. It can be so overwhelming! Cheer hasn’t even started yet, the SIGN UPs start next month and already the GroupMe messages are pouring in, so much so that I had to hide and mute the group.

    People have given great advice. When cheer season rolls around, checklists and calendars are my best friends. Also tackling one thing at a time. At the beginning of the season, organize what you will need and form your own check lists. Put those in plain sight. Then think ahead. How much pre-planning do you need for the upcoming event? Does the duffel bag need to be packed the night before? Or two days before? Or three Days before? I’ll even plan out how the day of the event needs to go, when we need to wake up – when we need to eat breakfast – etc. All this planning seems extreme, but it helps me stay calm, like OKAY, we got this.

    For some sports we have multiple duffels. A practice duffel and a game day duffel. Since my kiddos are notorious about just throwing their gear wherever, when we get home the first item of business is for them to take off every piece of gear and for those pieces of gear to either be laundered and put in the duffel or for the gear to go immediately back into the duffel. Everything from the bow, to the shoes to the water bottle. The duffels don’t go into the kids bedrooms, but stay in a cubby area we have set up in the main room.

    As far as communication – I’d ask for the head coach’s email address if you find it overwhelming to discuss the uniform or hair issues in the group. I always find the big group of Moms all trying to get in their two cents a very overwhelming and inefficient experience.

  • in reply to: Just the Facts Jack #78403

    Pump2Duncan
    Participant

    No, he does not have an autism diagnosis. Only a diagnosis for ADHD – combined type and an anxiety disorder. However, as the years progress (especially this past year) the signs of autism are becoming more noticeable (if that makes any sense). He turns 11 next month.

    After the meeting, I had a talk with my son and set a couple social rules. One was that when he finishes his math work super fast, instead of saying how easy the work is he ask his shoulder buddy if they need any help. If they say yes, then provide help. If they say no, then journal. We discussed how talking about how easy an assignment is or how bored we are with an assignment can make another person feel bad when they are struggling with the same assignment (which is what he was doing in class).

    Since throwing too many rules at him at once seems to overwhelm him, I think we’ll work on this one for a little while, then move on to conversations. In the meantime, I’ve started researching health professionals in our area that are covered by our insurance that might be able to give me more guidance.

  • in reply to: The 3 Year IEP Re-Evaluation #76829

    Pump2Duncan
    Participant

    Thanks Penny! My son was sent home with the Evaluation Report yesterday (very proud of himself that he did not open the sealed envelope…LOL). He scored exceptionally well on every academic portion of the evaluation, and exceptionally poor on every portion that required him to use or manipulate his working or short term memory. Several aspects bothered me, the administrator gave him extra time for his responses during timed subtests, noted his distractability and his inability to remain focused but due to his academic ability concluded that he should be able to “self-correct” his inability to remain focused. And the tests were done over several days, broken up into several sessions.

    Nowhere in the report did it mention his ADHD or anxiety diagnoses or that he was on Concerta while the test was administered. I guess I’m just in shock. At last year’s meeting my son was doing just as well academically and the Dean was talking about how my son needed to be evaluated for ASD. It’s like the school has done a complete 180.

    I’m going to get started on that letter, I’m sure it will take me a few drafts. LOL.

  • in reply to: The 3 Year IEP Re-Evaluation #76760

    Pump2Duncan
    Participant

    And to update: The special ed teacher is going to send me the evaluations. Teacher said “[Your Son] was reevaluated to see if he still qualified for Special Education services. He was given the WISC-V and WAIT-III. While we will go over the results together, I can send you a copy of the results today and you can read them ahead of time.”

    To see if he STILL qualified? And one of those tests is largely academic, and you gave it to him first thing in the morning when his Concerta is in full effect. His accommodations are all related to his emotional regulation and ADHD. This makes zero sense. Right now he qualifies for his IEP under Multiple Disabilities; LD, Other Health Impairment (ADHD), and Emotional Disturbance (anxiety disorder). So how does the results of those evaluations going to show us if my son still qualifies for the IEP? We all know he’s academically gifted.

    I’m not understanding what the school is trying to accomplish here. I’m at a lose at how to prepare for the meeting. I could see potentially dropping LD from his IEP but he’d still qualify for services under the other two categories.

  • in reply to: Middle School next year – what questions do I need to ask #75951

    Pump2Duncan
    Participant

    Middle school can be a challenging time. I’d ask about all of the above and I would ask about how the teachers are with adaptability with accommodations, especially during the first semester. In my experience, every accommodation can be tacked down beforehand with the best of intentions but sometimes they just don’t work in the real world. Will the teachers adapt, will they work to see what works in their classroom and be more fluid with their accommodations? For example, my son had one teacher who noticed my son was having trouble picking up vocab words so instead of the standard assignment, he made him crossword puzzles to solve. The crossword kept him more engaged and he picked up the vocable more easily. Another noticed he couldn’t keep still during lectures, so he allowed him to journal since my son could still retain the information and journal at the same time. These were not in the plan, but were real world accommodations that worked.

    If your son wonders off easily, one thing I would be concerned about would be if he has to move from classroom to classroom if he hasn’t done that in elementary school. Is there a way for him to have his classes closer together? Or is there a way for him to practice his schedule before the first day of school? Might there be a teacher or counselor to keep an eye out for him the first few days since those are the most chaotic with lots of kids and distractions in the hallways.

    Lockers. Ok, this one is dingy, but even my neuro-typical child had an issue with the locker in middle school and this caused him some pre-first day anxiety. Luckily the principal knew this so they set up a time for the incoming 6th graders to practice with their combination locks for awhile before the first day of school. Really calmed his nerves.

    If he has anxiety, is there a Resource Room that he can go to at the Middle School to decompress or other special technique he might be able to utilize in the classroom, to cope with that anxiety and then incorporate that into his Plan. I would take your Plan from elementary school and build upon it.

  • in reply to: Overwhelmed and Exhausted Single Mom of 5 yr old with ADHD #74645

    Pump2Duncan
    Participant

    You situation sounds exactly like mine when my son was 5, right down to the single mom part. And I wholeheartedly agree with everything Penny said. Stimulant medication coupled with behavioral therapy is a terrific way to go. It’s at the bare minimum, the best starting place to give your son a great starting point.

    It’s a marathon, but it does get better. I’d focus the school on the FBA and the BIP. The IEP is important, but the behavior sounds like the main priority right now. Focus on one thing at a time. I became the squeaky wheel for about a year. And by squeaky wheel I just mean, I made sure my requests were made by formal emails or letters and I made sure to cc the principal and/or special education director. The BIP was EXTREMELY helpful. IMO suspended a 5 year old is not helpful. It doesn’t teach anything besides “if I’m bad, I get a day out of school”.

    Hang in there Momma! You got this!


  • Pump2Duncan
    Participant

    I just dealt with this with Walgreens. I had signed up for one of their online accounts and saw that they had filled my son’s Concerta medication with the Mallinckrodt generic (gray oblong pill with M 27) instead of the Actavis brand (gray cylinder ALZA 27) like they normally do. I called them up and stated I did not want the Mallinckrodt generic because the FDA said it was not bio-equivalent to Concerta and to please order the Actavis generic. If you google Mallinckrodt, FDA Notice, Concerta Generic you should be able to find the FDA studies that show their generic does not work the same as Concerta and the FDA has asked them to voluntarily remove their drug from the market, but the drug marker has refused.

    The pharmacist said it was just a different manufacturer, no big deal. That they simply didn’t have enough of the Actavis in stock to fill my son’s prescription so they filled it with the Mallinckrodt instead. I stuck to my guns and insisted that my son had enough of the medication on hand to wait for the Actavis order to become available. This time it only took 2 days, but they did fill it with what I know works.

    If you fill at Walgreens, I’d recommend getting their online account. It will show you the medication they have filled the prescription with before you go pick up the prescription, so if there are any issues, you’ll know beforehand. It will at least save you the headache of wasting a trip to the pharmacy.

  • in reply to: I'm overwhelmed #73298

    Pump2Duncan
    Participant

    We used PhoneSheriff. There are many teen monitoring apps available. But I will tell you, once I installed it on his phone, I did tell him it was there but did not tell him all of the features. I immediately saw his friends texting him ways that he could remove it. He tried several. Their ways did not work. When I saw those text messages come through, I casually told him that if I saw that the app was removed, the phone would be gone permanently.

    If access to the apps and internet is not a good idea right now, but she does need a phone to get a hold of you, maybe you could get her a flip phone or something similar that has zero ability to access the internet? My kids have had to tell their friends more than once they were grounded from their phones – and they’ve heard that from their friends more than once too.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 99 total)