mmmsb

My Forum Comments

Viewing 3 posts - 1 through 3 (of 3 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • in reply to: To Have an IEP or 504 Plan or not to have? #102643

    mmmsb
    Participant

    It makes me sad that your Christian school isn’t knocking themselves out looking for what is best for your child.
    I have ADD, my high school daughter is off-the-chart ADD, and I have a dear friend who teaches at a school for kids with learning differences. I have two thoughts: (1) if accommodations will let your daughter feel sane and do her best, why not ensure she has them? (2) I don’t think it’s ever too early to be thinking about college and the long term. These years between elementary and high school will help you and your child figure out what works best for her. Remember, you also have puberty coming. AND, as it stands now, if you don’t establish use of a 504 plan in high school, you can’t get it in college. My daughter wasn’t diagnosed until she was 16 and when I look back at the hell she suffered through, it breaks my heart.
    As for “the world” not accommodating her, that only makes it more urgent that you start helping her now with self-awareness and learning what *she* can do that will work for her in the big bad world. Best Wishes & Prayers for you.

  • in reply to: New doctor issues #102642

    mmmsb
    Participant

    I feel compelled to reinforce what has been suggested, but suggest you make it top priority:
    Get thee a NEW pcp! If he won’t reapect you and is willing to play fast and loose with your sanity, how can you trust him to take care of the rest of you?
    btw, drug seekers don’t ask just for a two week supply – just long enough to solve this problem created by the pcp.
    AND find a psychiatrist w ADD experience. I wouldn’t go to my psychiatrist for a mammogram – right doctor needed for the issue.
    Support from a trusted friend or family member could make a big difference while you’re working at a disadvantage. Good Luck and Take Care —

  • in reply to: High School Freshman Refusing to do Schoolwork #101592

    mmmsb
    Participant

    We went through the same agonizing tug of war with our daughter starting in about 8th grade — how can you be so bright and have such lousy grades??? Why don’t you do your homework? Why are you so angry?
    Then, at age 53, I was diagnosed with ADD. My daughter’s psychiatrist/therapist later referred her for some really top notch testing by a private company. Turns out that my brilliant little girl is about as ADD as it gets. Now the frustration and hurt have a name. In the process, I was flooded with understanding about my own life experiences and self image. I’m still sorting that out.
    My experience so far is that how well we live with ADD depends largely on how we view it. If I view it as a “learning disability” then all sorts of negative feelings wash over me (rightly or wrongly). When I view it as the weeds I have to mow through to get to the good stuff (accomplishment and understanding), it’s a lot easier. And everyone, absolutely everyone, has weeds of one kind or another that they have to mow through.
    I also have to break things down into tiny bites. I am learning to listen to my inner voice and when I feel overwhelmed, that’s my signal to break it into pieces. (I used to just cut and run!) And I’m learning to get creative with how I break it down.
    Maybe your daughter could focus on one class that she is really interested in and start experimenting with different techniques to see what works with her unique kind of brilliance. Maybe you could look for a reputable private company that tests for learning differences and take that to your 504 coordinator. Are any of the counselors or teachers in her school ADD? My daughter’s counselor (we later found out) was diagnosed as an adult. He gets it.
    I am so grateful that my daughter knows now at age 16 that she has this challenge. I went for years being told I was lazy, selfish, self-centered, inept and just a general screw-up. Those labels came from my own voice, in addition to that of others. Now I know that’s not true. I also understand that some things are never going to be strong points for me and that’s okay. At the end of the day, I’m a very good trial lawyer with people around me who support me and some killer hyperfocus when my case is called to trial. 🙂

Viewing 3 posts - 1 through 3 (of 3 total)