SierraW

My Forum Comments

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
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  • SierraW
    Participant

    I can relate to your story so much! When I found out I had ADHD I was had an instant, “Oh now it all makes sense” moment.

    I did very well in school until JR High where organization and studying start to become important. I dropped out of high school and got my GED without cracking a book. I tried college but it was a disaster. I made many terrible choices, ended up pregnant at 19 and was fired from many jobs. Finally at age 22 I was diagnosed with ADHD. At 23 I got my life together and was back in school but still had issues. I hadn’t sought accommodations and thought my Ritalin was enough to help me. After a semester and not doing well I dropped out again. I got married and had another child. While all this was going on I was unmedicated and worked hard to understand and figure out my ADHD. I listened to podcasts, read articles and tried many different strategies. This past year I returned to college and now have a 4.0. There have been issues with my medications and I have had to try different things and find a doctor who is compassionate and helpful. Ritalin was hit or miss for me and the generics can vary in efficacy. I use my accommodations and give myself breaks when I make mistakes or have a whirlwind of chaos. Learning about my ADHD and finding a good doctor have been the keys for me. I’ve tried specialists and psychiatrists but ended up with my family practice doctor managing my medications and this has been the most successful.

    When it comes to social relations, I am a total weirdo. I tend to over talk or under talk, interrupt, make bizarre connections and repel people from me. It used to hurt when I felt like a loner. Nowadays I don’t let it bother me. I understand that I’m different and people don’t always get me. I love my ADHD brain but I used to hate it! I see things others don’t and I love what my thoughts are capable of. There is still so much misunderstanding about ADHD and stigma attached to it. I’ve honestly had classmates say they wish they had ADHD so they could take tests in a quiet setting.

    Medicating ADHD is a process. Try to be patient and remember that you are not alone. Relay any and all issues with your doctor. Welcome and I wish you success in your bright future.

    in reply to: Going Back to School #92220
    SierraW
    Participant

    @lindsay

    Wow thanks for your response. It really helped. It is nice to know I’m not alone! You are so right on about feelings of guilt and anxiety when delegating tasks.

    I would love to chat more.

    Thanks!

    in reply to: I feel like I am being excluded at work #90174
    SierraW
    Participant

    Let me say first and foremost, BOY CAN I RELATE! I have been in similar situations all through my life. I am no expert on social skills, actually quite the opposite. I do however have a belief and affirmation that helps me in such times:

    “I am different and that is okay. I see the world differently and many people cannot relate. I like myself and that is enough.”

    Sometimes the rejection I am experiencing and feeling is imagined. Other times it is not. I can sit and analyze everything I said. Wincing and cringeing at myself when I said something impulsive or overshared or talked about myself for way too long. Or rereading an email that never got that hopeful reply 1,000x. It isn’t going to change who I am or what that person thinks of me. Many people will tell you to join a support group. This is a great idea but not always possible.

    Embrace yourself for who you are. I promise there are things that make you a great friend even if others can’t see them.

    Also, I know from first-hand experience that sometimes co-workers can be extremely toxic and play games. Avoid these people. Avoid gossiping people and never get sucked into that mindset. As people with ADHD we know what it is like to be misunderstood. A true friend would tell you if you did/do something that is rude.

    I am sorry you are going through this. Just remember, you are not alone!!!

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 4 months ago by SierraW.
    in reply to: Quitting Smoking with adhd #85972
    SierraW
    Participant

    Congrats in all the progress you’ve made!

    I have been tobacco free for over 3 years now. Quitting smoking is really hard but it is SO worth It! For me, I just had to make up my mind that I was never going to smoke another cigarette no matter what. Before I made this “firm” decision for myself I had attempted and failed to quit a dozen times. I even paid out of pocket for a very expensive cessation drug. I used nicotine patches and lozenges. There are many programs that will help you get these items at a discount or for free. I used more than I was supposed to at times. Especially during my shifts at work. I went from step one with lozenges to step 3 with no lozenges in about a month. I never allow myself a cigarette. Ever. This is how I’ve stayed without it.

    I had a cough at 24 due to smoking. I am happy to report that within weeks I felt better and wasn’t coughing. I hardly ever get sick anymore!

    I also added up how much I was spending on cigarettes and kept that number in my mind. Find some people who have quit and are encouraging. Smoking is so social it is important to find others to be around that don’t smoke!

    Good luck. You can do It!!!

    SierraW
    Participant

    I have pondered this question often. I’ve had a diagnosis for 5 years. I was diagnosed as an adult.

    It is hard for me to separate the two things. Identity and adhd. In fact I dont anymore. I repel people. I have always been that way. If I didn’t have my adhd to blame things on I would go back to a spiral of self hatred. That is not to say that I blame my adhd and move on. I continue working on managing my symptoms and using all of the strategies I have learned. It’s just that some days after not having a friend to call or talk to or reply to an email I need to have something to cling to. Something that lets me know that it isn’t that I’m not worth being around or knowing or just plain unlikable. I’m just different and that is okay.

    in reply to: Concerta and timing of administration #63475
    SierraW
    Participant

    I was on Concerta 54mg for about 6 months. I saw a lot of improvement in my function and concentration. TThen I went off of it for 2 years to have a baby and breastfeed. When I went back on it I started experiencing binge behavior about 8 hours after I took it. I also seemed to have worse insomnia. So my Dr switched me to Ritalin La 20mg 2x a day. I take the first dose before I get out of bed at 630am and the second at 2pm. This has worked for me much better. And as long as I don’t stay up too late I find it very easy to sleep. I have had insomnia my entire life and have found the only thing that helps is stimulant medication. I also switched to an all plant based diet which seems to help with overall energy throughout the day.

    This is just my personal experience. I hope it helps.

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)