Getittogethergirl

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 58 total)
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  • in reply to: Family hate me going on medication #186564
    Getittogethergirl
    Participant

    I am sorry you have to deal with that. That’s tough. I understand why people get nervous about medication. I used to get nervous about it, too, but here’s what helped me: Taking medication for ADHD is just like wearing glasses when your vision is blurry. It would be silly to insist someone go without glasses. Also, having ADHD means having a deficit of neurotransmitters. Your brain is actually missing ingredients that neurotypical brains have. The medicine compensates for those missing ingredients. Medication is not, “messing with” your brain, it’s standing in for neurotransmitters that other people’s brains manufacture on their own. I saw a meme once that said, “If you can’t make your own neurotransmitters, store-bought is fine.”

    I think it’s responsible to take the medications that will help you feel like yourself. You shouldn’t have to feel shamed about doing something that benefits your mental health and changes your life for the better. I give my 8-year-old medication and it gives me peace of mind that his brain and sense of self is able to develop with a balance of brain chemistry rather than with the imbalance that causes all sorts of issues in his life. My doctor also told me she loves treating ADHD because it’s one of the few mental health issues that responds incredibly well to medication. Maybe your family will come around if they see what a difference the right medication makes for you.

    I was really nervous to start medication and I put it off. When I took it for the first time, I got emotional over how much better I felt. I could not believe that normal people felt this calm and functional on a daily basis. I honestly think if your family could feel your struggles and feel the difference the right medication makes, they’d be all for you taking medication.

    in reply to: Afternoon Crash Adderall XR 25mg #183623
    Getittogethergirl
    Participant

    Similar to the previous post, my doctor has me on adderall Xr in the morning and then I take a 5 mg instant release adderall around 2 pm. Sometimes it makes it hard to fall asleep, but for the most part, it works well for me. Good luck. That sounds rough.

    in reply to: Rebound effect #183230
    Getittogethergirl
    Participant

    Same problem here with my 8 year old. Can’t find a med that doesn’t have mega rebound. My current doctor told me to stop his medication immediately if it happened. We’ve waited it out a few weeks to see if the rebound would go away with a different doctor but it did not. On the other hand, my bad side effects on adderall went away within a week. I think it must be different for kids, though.

    in reply to: Medication Woes #183229
    Getittogethergirl
    Participant

    Sounds like a tough struggle. So sorry. This might not be helpful but my doctor switched me from Zoloft to Desvenlafax because Zoloft was making me feel numb and my anxiety started to re-emerge on it. Sounds like you have a lot of good observations to share with your doctor though. I hope you find answers.

    in reply to: New Adderall generic Question #179252
    Getittogethergirl
    Participant

    My husband’s epilepsy responded to name brand but not generic and my brother who is in pharmaceuticals said that generic only has to work at something like 80% what the name brand does to get on the market (I can’t remember his exact words). Anyways, definitely tell your doctor or pharmacist you need the name brand and they can work with your insurance.

    in reply to: Slow and Steady #179248
    Getittogethergirl
    Participant

    I’m so sorry I just saw this. Probably not much help now, but I will share with you anyways.

    Exhaustion has been a huge struggle for me. At the time I wrote this I was on Adderall XR and Zoloft. Zoloft’s power wore off for me, so my doctor switched me to Desvenlafax. The Zoloft and desvenlafax were to treat anxiety.

    Even with Adderall I was not making it through the day without a nap, so my doctor said I was metabolizing my meds quickly and gave me a 5mg Adderall IR to take around 2pm as that’s when my tiredness came back.

    Now that I have a more normal energy level with the Adderall, I’ve been able to exercise more, which also helps my energy levels stay up. I have noticed, however, that Adderall’s appetite suppressing side effect makes me not eat regularly and makes healthy foods not as appealing, so I’ve had to be careful to eat nutritious foods throughout the day so as not to have energy dips, too.

    Also, if I don’t take my meds consistently, my energy levels are all over the place.

    Hope you found something that helps!

    in reply to: Taking things literally #179247
    Getittogethergirl
    Participant

    Thanks so much for the insights.

    in reply to: Mom with adhd can’t function as a parent anymore #176251
    Getittogethergirl
    Participant

    That feeling led me to my adhd diagnosis because it wouldn’t go away on anti-depressants. Adderall has helped me so much with that. I was completely immobilized mentally and so tired! I still get that way sometimes, especially when I feel over-stimulated or miss a dose. I am on anti-anxiety meds and adderall now and feel like a human being again.

    My doctor said that feeling of overwhelm to the point of paralysis is very common with adhd and so is tiredness.

    Also, I have always struggled with feeling tired/anxious but had been able to cope until I started having kids and new mommy responsibilities.

    in reply to: HAUNTING Wedding Trauma! #176117
    Getittogethergirl
    Participant

    I have social anxiety as well as ADHD, so I can relate to constantly reliving awkward, stupid, or even just plain bad moments I caused in the past and still feeling anxiety rise just thinking about them. And while I know I can’t change the past, my brain still wants to. I’ve started saying, “oh, well. Nothing I can do about it,” out loud to myself, whenever those thoughts plague me, which helps sometimes.

    But be kind to yourself and allow yourself to grow.

    Life is room to grow and time to practice. Put each day’s practice to bed at night and try again the next day, but don’t judge your self-perception off of yesterday’s practice. You are you today. Forgive yourself and others because we are all blundering along doing the best we can with what we know and believe.

    Sometimes talking to friends and family helps me remember to lighten up too. I also read an article once that suggested embracing thoughts like this and focusing in on the uncomfortable feelings they bring while making yourself aware of your physical sensations and feeling the anxiety rise and then fall repeatedly until your brain gets bored of it (Cognitive behavioral therapy). The idea was that sometimes we reinforce the anxiety by panicking when we feel the uncomfortable feelings instead of allowing them to play out.

    I hope you can find some peace. I am sorry you are having a hard time.

    in reply to: 5 1/2 year old symptoms #176090
    Getittogethergirl
    Participant

    Also, my son tried stimulant meds for the first time at age 6 but had really bad “rebound” symptoms when it wore off so we stopped and are just experimenting again with what works now that he’s eight. My doctor said that kids who experience this “rebound” usually grow out of it and it’s common for youngsters to have this problem. By “rebound” I mean he would have extreme mood swings when the meds wore off (yelling, crying, agitation). This was with adderall xr.

    in reply to: 5 1/2 year old symptoms #176086
    Getittogethergirl
    Participant

    This sounds a lot like my 5 year old daughter. She chews on everything and even got a bald spot from pulling/chewing her hair. She cannot settle to sleep and can stay wide awake even past midnight. My son has ADHD and so do I, so I would not be surprised if she ends up having it too, but she is also starkly different from my son in a lot of ways. For instance, she isn’t forgetful and can follow instructions well. She also keeps eye contact and, while she’s messy, she knows how to organize and can entertain herself for a while with one activity. She is extremely wiggly and is always chewing on little toys or her clothes or hair and at one point was too afraid to be in a room by herself (even the bathroom!) She is afraid at night but doesn’t even settle when we lay down with her. She told me she can’t turn her brain off and has repeating thoughts (ruminating).

    Her doctor diagnosed her with generalized anxiety disorder and sensory-seeking behaviors and described how she uses chewing and wiggling to relieve anxiety and calm herself. She also tics sometimes by clearing her throat obsessively but that comes and goes. She is currently on a low dose of Prozac, which has helped. We just went up on the dosage because it hasn’t helped everything yet and bedtime is still a struggle. The doctor also wants me to find her a therapist.

    Hope that helps! Good luck!

    in reply to: Guanfacine and Strattera #176071
    Getittogethergirl
    Participant

    My son is on low dose guanfacine and the doctor just prescribed Focalin to take with it.

    Getittogethergirl
    Participant

    This is me too!

    I think a lot of my “debit card loose in bag” tasks stem from the “now” or “not now” mentality. In other words, I constantly sabotage my future self because my present self doesn’t care about my future self, so future self can deal with it cuz present self just.can’t.even.

    But why the heck is my present self such a jerk? I don’t really know, but I imagine it has something to do with ADHD brains not processing rewards like other people and because it knows no reward is involved chemically for responsibly putting away your card, it stops you so you can find something more stimulating to do like get annoyed at yourself for not putting it away and risking losing it. And if you do end up losing it, your brain just banked a bonus adrenaline spike for when you are pulling your wallet out to pay.

    I do this all the time- especially when a mundane task requires more than one step (Good to use if you are trying to avoid something like eating junk food). Maybe get rid of your wallet altogether and get a bag you can just drop your debit card in. Then you’ll know it’s always in your bag. One step, no problem.

    And the video game thing is totally hyperfocus. It is painful to get pulled out of it, even when you aren’t enjoying what you are focused on anymore. My husband often has the task of pulling me out of the hyperfocus and it almost always intensely irritates me and I have to take a minute to physically walk away from my hyperfocus task. Sometimes it helps to set a time where I will return to the task, but most of the time, leaving a hyperfocus just sucks and makes me irritable.

    You might consider upping your meds because the symptoms you described are totally adhd related. I can’t say my meds have completely solved those issues for me, but I am still figuring out my dosages.

    in reply to: School Help #136488
    Getittogethergirl
    Participant

    You are wonderful in your willingness to offer support to him. I was diagnosed after I was out of school and got good grades but at a high cost. Looking back now, I realize a lot of my study habits were so inefficient that they became hugely overwhelming. I offer my hindsight in hopes it can give some help.

    1. I saw deadlines as either “now” or “not now” meaning I could not motivate myself to do any schoolwork before last minute.

    2. I had no idea how to study and would spend too much time just rereading the textbook instead of quizzing myself on notes or reviewing what I didn’t know.

    3. I could not remember due dates or details of assignment requirements if they were not written down.

    4. I was constantly forgetting to bring assignments I had completed or forgetting where I put them.

    I had great parents who helped a lot, but we didn’t know what ADHD was. If you can get a few things in place for him, he can learn some tools that will help him the rest of his life. I would suggest a white board at home where he lists his tasks. Note that he will see the task in its entirety, so teach him how to break it down. For instance, instead of “write paper” he could write, “research paper topics” and then “choose topic”. You are so right about him needing outside help. It is hard to understand because skills that seem very natural to neurotypical people are foreign to people with adhd not because they are dumb or irresponsible, but because their executive function departments are out to lunch. A helpful metaphor is looking at the brain as needing glasses for executive function. The brain is constantly squinting in that area. I am sure your love and support will bless him now and in the years to come.

    in reply to: Zombie Syndrome on Adderall XR? Need help #127340
    Getittogethergirl
    Participant

    I am on those same meds. You might need a lower dose or a short adderall break or you might need a higher dose. Call your doctor.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 58 total)