geobeck

My Forum Comments

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  • in reply to: Tolerance to Vyvanse, What’s Next? #187792
    geobeck
    Participant

    I’m in the same boat. I’ve been referred to a new psychiatrist (old one left), but it’s taking a while to get connected, what with COVID-19 and health care cuts. I stopped letting my GP modify my meds because it was obvious he doesn’t have the experience to make changes based on a complex neurological situation. I concentrate far better than I did pre-meds, but that old fogginess is creeping back.

    Maybe see if your doc can convince your insurance to compromise: get generic lisdexamphetamine in return for adding a non-stimulant like Guanfacine. Or maybe start the years-long process of moving to Canada…which would still be faster than waiting for decent healthcare in the US.

    in reply to: Exhausted after interactions with people? #187791
    geobeck
    Participant

    Some degree of social anxiety is definitely common, but if it’s extreme (needing to go somewhere silent & isolated after a one-on-one conversation with someone new), it could suggest some degree of autism. It might be worth consulting a psychiatrist. I know an autistic person who has successfully coped with extreme social anxiety through a combination of medication and therapy.

    For me, it’s a combination of noise and crowds, and COVID-19 has made it that much worse. There are times (even pre-COVID) when I just have to get out of a loud, busy situation and de-stress. Ironically, substituting my own loud sound (classical music on full blast) often works best.

    in reply to: 3 months on Vyvanse now found my ‘ideal dose’ #187790
    geobeck
    Participant

    @markymark, three months to find your ideal dose is pretty good. I’m 51, diagnosed 6 months ago, and still haven’t found that. I had a treatment interruption when my psychiatrist left, and my GP tried to manage my meds. After convincing him that I needed a specialist because of drug interactions & uncertain side effects, he gave me a referral to a new psychiatrist, but with the current medical situation in Alberta, I’m still waiting.

    One caution: If lisdexamphetamine (Vyvanse) affects your quality of sleep, your doc may prescribe quetiapene (Seroquel). Sleep aid is a common but off-label use for quetiapene, and it has a few common side effects that can make it undesirable, such as orthostatic hypotension: low blood pressure when standing up. For me it was so bad, I’d nearly pass out unless I focused on standing up slowly.


    @ryoto
    , a lot of people are wary of being on medication regularly, but for a neurochemical imbalance, medication creates the situation that ‘normal’ people have already. Not being on medication is kind of like your brain putting you on harmful medication. I hope that makes sense; for me, medication has made a huge difference, even if I am still tweaking the dose.

    in reply to: Adderall XR stopped working after a WEEK? Please help. #186319
    geobeck
    Participant

    Most important thing: Don’t lie to your doctor! Next, make sure you have a psychiatrist managing your case, not just a GP.

    ADD is not perfectly understood, despite years of case studies. Messing around with your own dose and not telling your doctor is a recipe for disaster.

    Having said that, I’m experiencing something similar. After five months of treatment, the effect of my meds is reducing. My original psychiatrist is no longer available, so my GP was trying to tweak my dosage, but I’m getting worse, so I insisted on a referral to another psychiatrist.

    Meanwhile I’m waiting, continuing my current dosage, even with reduced effectiveness. I don’t want to screw up my brain by making unpredictable changes.

    Be patient, be honest, and be insistent with your doctor. He’s not in charge, but he needs all the information if he’s going to help you.

    in reply to: COVID question #186203
    geobeck
    Participant

    Part of my job is writing policies based on the latest COVID-19 information, and I haven’t heard anything about ADHD vs. COVID-19 mortality. There’s no physiological reason for there to be a connection. The most significant factor is age.

    My best advice for your son is to try different types of masks. But remember, the best preventive measure is to limit contact with other people. Keep up all of the various precautions; they work together, not separately.

    in reply to: ADHD & Vasovagal Syncope / Fainting #186025
    geobeck
    Participant

    Interesting. I started three meds for ADD a few months ago: vynase, Wellbutrin, and Quetiapene. Soon after, I started experiencing orthostatic hypotension, nearly passing out if I stood up too fast. As a result, I went off Quetiapene, because that’s listed as a common side effect, but I still experience it to a smaller degree.

    It reinforces the fact that I need a specialist, rather than relying on my GP.

    in reply to: Blood Pressure Prescription for ADHD??? #185937
    geobeck
    Participant

    Replying because I want to follow this discussion. I’ve been on Vynase & Wellbutrin for a few months now, but I need something else due to side effects including interrupted sleep. I was on Quetiapene, but significant orthostatic hypotension made me get rid of that.

    in reply to: ADDforever/new to treatment #185884
    geobeck
    Participant

    I’m also new to treatment at age 50. Vynase 30 crashed after 3-4 hours? That’s what happens to me on especially stressful days. I started on 20, and my regular crashes were the reason my doc raised my dose–which, unfortunately, has made little difference.

    I’m currently looking for a new psychiatrist. (Old one is no longer available, and my GP doesn’t have the specialized knowledge.) If you can find a psychiatrist who specializes in ADD, that’s extremely valuable.

    in reply to: scared of becoming an adult w adhd #185882
    geobeck
    Participant

    If your medication makes you feel terrible, it’s probably not the right medication. Did a regular doctor diagnose you, or a specialist? I was diagnosed by a psyhciatrist with a specialty in ADD. Unfortunately, he’s no longer available, and my GP just doesn’t have the knowledge to manage my case.

    One thing that will help: Read Driven to Distraction by Hallowell & Ratey. Hallowell is one of the foremost ADD experts. The case studies they describe will show you how ADD at various ages can be managed, and their explanations (which are very readable, not overly academic) will help you understand your mind.

    geobeck
    Participant

    When you start understanding your condition, you start seeing it everywhere, so be aware that your relatives may not have the condition. Having said that, ADD tends to be found in relatives, so it’s cetainly possible.

    I was diagnosed in May at age 50, and starting treatment was like seeing clearly for the first time. If it’s possible to have a psychiatrist diagnose your relatives, that’s a valuable step. If they do have it, they will certainly benefit from treatment.

    If you have to start with your family doctor, that’s only preliminary. Standardized questionnaires are no substitute for specialized expertise.

    in reply to: VYVANSE #185880
    geobeck
    Participant

    I’ve been on Vynase since May, first 20 mg, now 30 mg. The downside for me is that if I’m especially stressed or tired, the effect seems to wear off faster. The upside is that it’s a convenient once a day medication that has helped me concentrate at work and be much more productive.

    Context: Newly diagnosed at age 50, non-hyperactive, strong coping mechanisms before diagnosis & medication.

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)