General Chow

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  • in reply to: I've always been triggered by change. Thoughts? #134611
    General Chow
    Participant

    Everyone experiences those intense emotional reactions when stimulated by an upsetting event, including unwanted changes in a person’s life. It’s natural for all people to dwell on the emotional event, especially a significant one like when a parent or pet passes away. People with ADD are more likely to have these deficits when it comes to emotional regulation, which is the ability to modify an emotional state so as to promote adaptive, goal-oriented behaviors.

    The Anterior Cingulate Gyrus is the portion of the brain responsible for allowing us to move from thought to thought, co-operate, and see errors. It is basically a shift-gear that transitions our attentions away from emotional events. An overactive anterior cingulate gyrus may will cause a person to get thoughts stuck in their head, worry excessively, upset easily, and obsess over things. The cause of an over-active anterior cingulate gyrus is low serotonin levels in the brain.

    I’d don’t know your situation, but I’d imagine it’s tough watching other people get on with their lives. I’d advise you to look for other positive distractions in life.

    in reply to: Feeling Set up to Fail at Work #108034
    General Chow
    Participant

    I’ve managed numerous multifamily construction projects with numerous employees, and I was thrown into that position without any experience. I had to manage people, which I found easier than managing myself. It’s three interns. Trust me when I tell you that this can help you succeed. Delegating tasks to interns is a fantastic way for you to solve some of your ADD problems. For example, I used a secretary to organize folders in a manner that kept me organized, which was a big help to me. When I tried doing it myself, I would mess it up even though it was my organization system. Crazy huh? Obviously, I don’t know the exact situation, but I feel like that your problem comes with a universal remedy. It’s three interns that you control. All of them yearning for your attention, respect, and recommendation. The possibilities are endless. I hope I can provide aid to your situation with the advice as followed:

    1) Positivity, Plans and Goals. Plan and pre-plan. Our goals are manageable when we plan. What are the goals? What do the interns need to learn? When do they need to learn it? When can you teach or mentor them? When can you mentor? Devise a plan to complete that goal. Find the times in the day that provides an opportunity for you to mentor the interns, and find the time in your day when you need to complete tasks. The great part about being the boss is that you get to decide the course of action, so take this assignment by the balls and make it work for you. Make this work for you. Asking the interns to do menial tasks like getting coffee or lunch for the office is great benefit that will make you look good. Teach them how to do your assignments, and ask them to do it as a team.

    2) Set Schedules and Boundaries. Schedule the day for your interns like a teacher creates a curriculum to keep students busy and working. For example: 8AM you will teach them how to complete some of their daily tasks, especially some of the daily tasks that are repetitive, easy, and waste your time. Tell them not to disturb you with questions until 11AM. At 11AM you correct their mistakes and give them orders until 1PM. Etc. etc. Tell your interns not to bother you during this time, unless it’s absolutely critical. If you think they are screwing up, pop into their room to see what’s up and tell them this is the time to ask questions. However, you need to make sure you create space and division between time spent interacting with interns and the time needed to complete work. You need to make certain your interns understand when it’s acceptable and unacceptable to disturb you from your work.

    3) Identify the Competent Intern and Delegate Authority. Create a head intern position. Give the position to the most competent person. If that person fails you, give it to someone else. If the head intern cannot answer a question, then the head intern may ask for your assistance. Only the head intern may come to you during your work time. I’d rather have one person disturb me instead of three. This is called centralization.

    4) Effective Mentoring. Teach your interns how to complete an assignment as a group. Don’t just teach on an individual basis. If you feel that an intern needs a long explanation or correction, assemble all the interns so they can hear. Make them write notes. You are trying to limit interruptions. Better yet, let them sit in your office and watch you complete your work, and talk out loud so you can tell them all the steps they need to take in order to complete the assignment. Then make them complete that same task while everyone supervises.

    5) Put the Onus on your Interns to Collaborate. Make your Interns collaborate with each other on assignments. One of them is bound to have the right answer.

    By the way, I don’t mind be called out if you disagree or hate it. Were brainstorming here.

    in reply to: Vyvanse (60mg) for 10 Years #108028
    General Chow
    Participant

    You need to take a break from prescription use. The biggest mistake I made during graduate school is not taking a semester off to recover from my medication. You need to eliminate your use for a long period in order to diminish your tolerance. At the very least, limit your usage to the weekdays, and abstain during holidays, breaks, etc. Your body is telling you it’s had “enough”. It’s tired of filtering drugs out of your body, and it’s definitely struggling to deal with the drug and it’s symptoms, especially given the depletion of damage-reducing and preventing nutrients necessary to keep your body from decaying such as magnesium, iron, and zinc.

    By the way, magnesium is the most effective mineral for sleeping. You need it. Pumpkin seeds are the best source.

    From my experience, and I know this is hard thing to do, but you need to start planning for the long-term. You can’t stay on these drugs forever. Is it feasible for you to complete day-to-day tasks without vyvanse? It might have to be. 60 mg of Vyvanse and 10 mg of adderall is alot. I’m not telling you this to scare you. I am a male approaching 30 and I can feel the effects of prescription use on my body. I know something is wrong. I have limited my use to fridays, so I can get all the work done that requires the most focus, and then use the weekend to recover.

    in reply to: motivation #108024
    General Chow
    Participant

    Motivation and actuation is a constant issue for my ADD brain, especially as I start drifting towards my 30s. Getting your desires figured out like the poster above-mentioned is definitely the path forward, but It’s sometimes difficult to identify or find the things you desire. I think the suggestion below will help.

    Like a workout buddy or a sponsor for Alcoholics Anonymous, I think it’s pivotal for a person with ADD to find support groups and friends. You need somebody that you can call at 7:00 AM in the morning. Somebody that’s going to push you out of bed, and someone that you can talk to about your goals, passions, and fears. A real friend. My friend and I call each other every morning while commuting to work. We check in. Sometimes when I’m in bed feeling all anxious and depressed, my friend calls me out on my laziness, and I find the strength to pull my corpse into the shower, or out for a run.

    Not only does it give persons with ADD someone that they are accountable to, but also, the sponsor system provides you with someone that you can count on when you need motivation (or just a friendly voice). It allows you to develop a relationship with someone that you can relate with, as well as someone that knows your foibles and BS excuses. One of the goals of this relationship should be to find the activities and professions that interest you, develop goals, and implement actions that will bring both person’s closer to their goals.

    I know it sounds silly, but this is something that you can do. This is something that can be accomplished. It provides you with a system for developing goals and desires, and pushing towards those goals and desires. Individuals with ADD are going to need this type of system as they get older, and can no longer rely on their parents, teachers, and friends for support.

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