evae1izabeth

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  • evae1izabeth
    Participant

    I forgot to mention, it’s really great that he is recognizing and connecting with other kids over Minecraft in the real world. You can use that to to his advantage because so many kids are interested in the topic. It will be easier for him to practice conversation skills, and you can guide him by offering suggestions. If he practices asking questions, and then actually listening and responding to what the person says, starting to watch for social cues, in time he will be able to generalize those conversation skills to school and other social situations. Kids more than ever are really struggling to develop conversation skills that really go back and forth and aren’t two people in their own monologues. Most kids with add need one part or another of the social stuff spelled out for them a bit, even the highly social ones.


  • evae1izabeth
    Participant

    Have you considered letting him earn it every other day or more frequently for a shorter amount of time? I know it can be a hassle, but keep in mind that getting off when he’s supposed to with the right attitude, and finding something else that’s productive or enriching to do afterwards, are skills he also needs practice building. If he’s motivated to build something great with LEGOS for 2 hours after he gets off the computer on Monday, it really doesn’t matter if it started out because he’s motivated to play again on Wednesday. He’s still learning the skill he really needs to practice, which is to develop free time play skills and habits (which can become coping skills), and you have a way to motivate him to do it more often. If it’s a matter of limiting screen time, maybe consider spreading the same amount throughout the week and linking it to his other free time habits. If it’s a matter of getting him off the computer afterwards, link that behavior to playing next time. Supervision can also be solved creatively by adjusting the time of day, location of the device, etc. to adapt to your needs.

    Maybe make a project out of creating a poster, list, or a jar of popsicle sticks with “I’m bored activities?”

    My kids earned all of their screen time with a “star” system when they were younger. Every once in a while it meant a longer marathon because they ran around doing extra jobs, reading, and doing nice things for each other, but it was totally worth it. They were practicing the important skills way more than they were on the computer, and it didn’t happen as often as you might expect.


  • evae1izabeth
    Participant

    I don’t get on my phone in the morning except to check my email (my kids’ school communicates by email). I always start cleaning or working on things first. If I do that, usually the momentum of getting going on something is motivating enough to me to keep me from avoiding life with my phone. I don’t really try to curb it at other times. Maybe that’s bad, but I enjoy being able to hop from one thing to another and have 20 windows open in my phone, and it helps me deal with things like lines and waiting in the car (not while driving 😉 that made me avoid a lot of other errands before. For me it’s about setting limits I know I can accept and not trying to be perfect.

  • in reply to: Lunch Accommodations Added to an IEP #91767

    evae1izabeth
    Participant

    This post really hit a nerve with me – I logged to post my first reply here!

    First of all, as a parent I am completely horrified of the idea that a school nutrition policy would in any way extend to a lunch sent from home. I realize the days of birthday cookies for the class are over, but to tell me what to send with my kid in his lunch when the issue isn’t a peanut allergy? I would be livid. I’m surprised you don’t have a plethora of angry parents.

    I know the point here is to get you the help you need for your own kid, and you have some great advice to help you, but as a parent of a child with serious medical issues in addition to ADHD, who had both a g-tube and a j-tube for 8 years and still isn’t even on the growth chart at all for his age; and as a parent who knows a lot about managing the nutrition AND emotional issues regarding food in a family of children with very different nutritional needs, I’m saying this is a policy worth fighting. I know you probably don’t have time to lead a protest or anything 😉 but I hope that as you get the approval you need for your child, you can use your situation to diplomatically point out the flaws in the policy.

    I believe in good nutrition, and i believe in a nutrition policy that guides what the school serves and food that’s shared in class. At the end of the day, though, I reserve the RIGHT to send my kids with a lunchbox full of cookies – even though I never would. I can promise there are other children who are impacted by this policy and are not getting what they need because they don’t have a doctor’s note or their parents aren’t as educated and assertive as you.

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