Kaylis

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  • in reply to: Inclusion class segregates special ed students #109535
    Kaylis
    Participant

    I would definitely pursue fixing the situation in the first grade as well as ask about it in the meeting and specifically make sure it says in the new IEP exactly what situations your child will be out of the general education classroom. This might be for one-on-one or small group work, but should only happen for something special like music therapy or after your child has shown themselves too distracted to get supportive help in that classroom or in specific need of personal instruction like reading. These should also be examined annually. If this isn’t what happens it is no where near mainstreaming, much less inclusion. Telling the school you would like to observe in both the “inclusion” room and where the students are taken before signup_user_complete the new IEP might also be a good idea.

    For the poster who said you couldn’t really know what the situations is the other children being pulled out are because you can only talk to the parents, this isn’t necessarily true. The IEP document the school should be following is the same as any shown to you by other parents.

    For example, I have a son with both ADHD and Down syndrome who has actually been included for the vast majority of every day throughout school, and he’s now 15. For ninth grade we were offered a class with other children in special education for reading, writing, and math, but it was a explained by the lead Spec. Ed. specialist and we discussed what the alternatives were based on our goals for him and his 1st grade skills in these reading, writing, and math. Up until now he’s only been out of the classroom at specific, limited times for subjects he couldn’t do in the other class because he was too distracted by what everyone else was doing and we were always asked and for the music therapy that was our decision for him to do. In face a few times in middle school he brought home assignment sheets obviously not his because he took a copy as they were passed out.

    This year he is also taking a mix of general education classes (earth science, ASL (with a specially trained instructional aide), PE/health, introductory culinary science (though learning to cook things for home when the others talk about finances and management), and introduction to child development, along with two periods of focused education in a separate classroom with 11 other kids and their aides and the lead special ed teacher where they cover reading, writing, math, and sometimes fun things. We are lucky in that this district truly believes and demonstrates a high degree of inclusion, but the main point is removal should be specific to the child’s needs and with the knowledge and agreement of the parent(s) in all cases.

    in reply to: Why does hydrocodone help my adhd but adderall doesn’t? #100154
    Kaylis
    Participant

    I disagree with many of the others who’ve responded, so I particularly hope you see this, solost28. I’m thrilled you’ve found something that helps and I suggest you use this information to search for other sorts of medications that boost dopamine and see if they help as well. Hydrocodone isn’t something if want to take solely for this reason, but the fact you have taken it for this reason doesn’t mean you’re an addict. Please, though, be careful what you say to your doctor so they don’t believe you are one.

    I have ADD, though I am sometimes also hyperactive. I can’t take any stimulants because I have high blood pressure, and wasn’t diagnosed until I was almost 30. Now in my 50’s I long ago also found that taking opiates often helps control my symptoms. The explanation that these pain meds boost dopamine makes sense, however, this is not necessarily too much dopamine because people with ADD/ADHD frequently have low levels of it (as explained to me by doctors, a psychiatrist, and in multiple articles on ADDitude). This low level is why dopamine-boosting antidepressants are often used for testing depression in those with ADD/ADHD.

    With that said, I am on long term treatment for serious chronic pain using both long and short acting opiates. When my pain is correctly treated so I can function on a day-to-day basis with only a low level of pain my ADD symptoms are also better controlled than when my pain is higher. At the same time high levels of pain does mess with concentration, so the medicines seems to help in both ways.

    One confusion that has been expressed is that experiencing physical withdrawal is both a sign of addiction and means you’ve developed a tolerance for it requiring dose increase. Neither is true! Chronic pain specialists say and professional research shows that physical withdrawal symptoms are not an indicator of psychological addiction, nor should it be called addiction. Neither is a desire to avoid being in serious, life altering pain. An addiction is characterized by drug seeking behavior such as going to multiple doctors and hospitals asking specifically for opiates despite not having any symptoms of serious pain, buying illegal opiates such as heroin and other people’s prescription ones, and such behaviors. Physical symptoms of withdrawal, which are completely miserable, have nothing to do with needing a dose increase due to tolerance. Tolerance is indicated by reduction in the reduction of pain you experience. It happens sometimes, but certainly not always. I’ve been on the same doses for over a year, and any increases I’ve needed over the years have been due to things like almost dying in a car accident and having multiple facial fractures that have never healed.

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