alittlebluerose

My Forum Comments

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  • in reply to: It's just 15-20 minutes… it's not a big deal #124806

    alittlebluerose
    Participant

    I relate to the whole being late in the morning but not for the rest of the day thing. It’s always the first thing, the leave-the-house thing, that I’m late to. Once I’m already “out in the world” it gets easier. I open at work a lot which is usually 7:30AM, which is the worst because then I don’t sleep enough because I can’t get to bed early. But even when I have something that’s later or I wake up earlier, or do the “okay pretend you have to be there 15 minutes earlier” thing, I’ll think, “oh, I have some extra time now! I can do X.” Hahaha no! Thankfully when I open the building (I work at a movie theater) it’s not a big deal because… I’m the first one there and it’s just me, so I’m really just shorting myself a bit of time to get everything ready. But I still beat myself up over it. And it’s almost always exactly seven minutes that I’m late, every time. I have no idea how that happens!!!

    Actually this website just posted an article about “time blindness” and all kinds of cool time strategies, and one thing from there that has actually helped me is the idea to put post-its in different rooms of the house that say what time you have to finish and leave that room. i.e. “Leave the bathroom by 7:32” or whatever time you need. The article is here: https://www.additudemag.com/time-management-skills-adhd-brain/ I hope one of those tips helps you! And remember that it’s not because you’re lazy or stupid. Your brain just literally conceptualizes time itself differently from other people. You sound like a very hard worker and a good teammate!

  • in reply to: Academically-Inclined Folks w/ADHD? #124809

    alittlebluerose
    Participant

    Thank you guys for sharing! It seems like there are lots of people who don’t get diagnosed until after going all the way through school. What Madison.Jarvis said about not having a goal to work towards making life falling apart makes a lot of sense. I thought that the problem was simply that I was overwhelmed with too much to do and when I had JUST work to worry about, my mental health would get a LOT better. Nope. It’s definitely nice not to have a bunch of required social events and assignments and clubs and the pressures of comparison, but now I have NO structure except for work. And no one supporting my creativity and passions. And everything from here on out requires self-starting, which I just… can’t do for some reason. I’m going to have to pay so much extra for a flight to visit family in Colorado because it’s in two weeks and I still haven’t booked it because I just keep procrastinating and forgetting! I feel like a fraud who’s going to fail at being an adult. I think it might be good to see someone and get evaluated, but don’t know where to start. Also I don’t think my dad would believe me because I’m the “smart, successful” child who just needs to “be a little more responsible…” and a lot neater. /: I am seeing a regular family counselor this Monday through my job’s EAP, though, for anxiety/depression/anger/all that jazz.

  • in reply to: Rejection Sensitivity at Work #124808

    alittlebluerose
    Participant

    Oh yes. I took the RSD test and the only question I didn’t answer in the affirmative was about diagnoses, because I haven’t ever seen a psychiatrist. My brother who has been diagnosed with ADHD has RSD also, and we started talking about it together. We laughed when we realized that’s why the two of us have the most intense fights in the house! We called it getting stuck in a “RSD loop.”

    Thank you for the meditation techniques to try!

  • in reply to: Coping as an artist? #124455

    alittlebluerose
    Participant

    You just described my life but with writing instead of visual art. I wrote a lot in college because I had projects and assignments, but now that I’ve graduated it’s so much harder. I love thinking the stories in my head but never want to bother with writing them down. Or just write the “interesting parts” and get bored just like you said! And it does feel like a particularly deep and personal failure. I haven’t found a solution, but I wanted to offer my solidarity. Reading your post made me feel like I was not alone. And I wanted to encourage you that you are still an artist even in “dry seasons” where you don’t create. The creative power is still in you; your symptoms are just coming in between that power and tangible pieces of art. I believe in you and in all of us artists who currently feel alienated from our passions— that we will find a good stride again!

Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)