Which book should I read on ADD?

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    • #110272
      candlelight
      Participant

      If I’m gonna read only one book on ADD, which book should I read? I need a book that gives me techniques to manage my ADD.

      Driven to Distraction, Delivered from distraction, You mean I’m not lazy, crazy or stupid – which book is the best?

      Or any other suggestions please?

    • #110276
      Fluttermind
      Participant

      Delivered from Distraction. It’s a more up-to-date follow up to Driven to Distraction and does a really good job of describing how the ADHD mind works. I was diagnosed at 25, after a turbulent academic career during which everyone was exasperated that I couldn’t/wouldn’t “just try harder”. I ended up giving my copy to my parents to read, so they could understand what’s been going on in my head for all this time. They had a very incomplete and backwards perception of what ADHD was (a big reason why I was never tested for it as a kid/teenager), so this book helped them a lot, and helped me a lot as well.

      • #110280
        candlelight
        Participant

        Thanks! I will try reading it. Also, does this book focus on ADD or ADHD?

    • #110288
      Fluttermind
      Participant

      Both, because they are one in the same, just different facets of the same disorder. Technically, it’s now all ADHD, but with different subtypes – you have inattentive, hyperactive/impulsive, and combined. This new classification is to address the fact that ADHD is kind of shifty in how it presents in people – people who are hyperactive as kids may become restless and inattentive as adults, girls are more likely to be inattentive, etc. It’s all the same brain wiring, but depending on gender, age, etc., it can present differently.

    • #110304
      Dr. Eric
      Participant

      My first go to’s were:
      the Hallowell and Ratey Books for first diagnosis – gives a sense of hope and self-discovery.

      Taking Charge of ADHD or Taking Charge of Adult ADHD by Russell Barkley.
      These books are extremely dry and academic oriented, but, in my opinion, the most comprehensive and research-based.

      They complement each other in a Yin Yang way in terms of style and content.

    • #110520
      Deep
      Participant

      Candlelight, I also recommend the following:

      Is It You, Me, or Adult A.D.D.?
      by Gina Pera

      Outside the Box: Rethinking ADD/ADHD in Children and Adults—A Practical Guide
      by Thomas E. Brown, Ph.D.

      Like Russell Barkley, these two authors do not sugar-coat the truth of ADHD yet are empathetic and offer practical suggestions. If sustained reading is difficult, all three (Barkley, Brown and Pera) have videos on YouTube and audiobooks. Barkley’s videos are particularly noteworthy.

    • #113266
      jcastroreyes
      Participant

      There’s a book I found called “You Mean I’m Not Lazy, Stupid, or Crazy?! A Self-Help Book for Adults with Attention Deficit Disorder” by Kate Kelly and Peggy Ramundo. It’s an older book on ADD, but it has some timeless advice for those who have ADD/ADHD that more current research has expounded further upon. “Delivered From Distraction” is an amazing book as well, being as up to date as possible on what ADHD does to the mind and how to harness its gifts and reduce the struggles.

    • #113285
      Skypark962
      Participant

      Any of Dr. Amen’s books. Highly recommend you check out the 7 types of Adhd he talks about–not sure if that’s a book yet.

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