This mama needs serious help with relentless ADHD almost 6-year old

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This topic contains 1 reply, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Penny Williams 3 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #116866

    amyalyce
    Participant

    Hi all,

    I need some help/suggestions, please. My almost six-year old son was (finally) diagnosed with ADHD (combined type) and anxiety almost a month ago. He is *relentless* with his demands on me, alternating between demanding I play with him or help him while he plays, yelling and screaming at me to go away, etc. We’ve been up for over three hours and it has literally been nonstop, and this is NORMAL. I can’t take it anymore! I also have a 2.5-year old daughter who has been parked in front of cartoons by herself because I can’t get five minutes uninterrupted. I am an introvert. I can’t take this! Add to it that my hubby, who also has ADHD (diagnosed seven years ago and untreated by choice) had to work this morning (left at 4:00am) and is 1.5 hours late coming home (also normal – doesn’t track time). I am grateful to understand all of this is related to ADHD, because I have felt like a bad mom/bad person to be so tapped and frustrated and wanting to run away for the last few years. Now I know. But PLEASE…how do I cope with this? What can I do for my son so that I can get some peace?! (He is almost through a 30-day rest of Ritalin and takes his dose at 7:00am.)

    • This topic was modified 3 months, 1 week ago by  amyalyce.
  • #116907

    Penny Williams
    Keymaster

    First, talk with the prescribing doctor about the results of medication so far and see if you need to increase his dosage or try a different medication. Is what he’s on right now helping?

    Second, find stimulating play for him. He likely needs you with him all the time, engaging with him all the time because he’s trying to find the stimulation his brain needs (and doesn’t produce on its own). There are many products and activities that help sensory seekers, like weighted blankets or vests, tactile objects and fidgets, jumping, bouncing, and more:

    3 Great Products for Sensory-Seeking Kids

    What is he really interested in? Legos? Coloring? Slime? Use what interests him to help him gain some independence in play. “You’re so good at building Legos! I bet you can make a car all by yourself. I’m going to be in the kitchen while you show me how you can build a car all by yourself.” That’s one example.

    Anxiety is another possible explanation. He may need you in the room to feel safe or out of fear that something will happen to you when you’re not together.

    [Self-Test] Does My Child Have Generalized Anxiety Disorder?

    Penny
    ADDitude Community Moderator, Parenting ADHD Trainer & Author, Mom to teen w/ ADHD, LDs, and autism

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