Teacher vs Therapist

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    • #100829
      lmcclellan
      Participant

      I am new to the ADHD world. My 5 year old son has just been diagnosed with it this month. He has been in outside of school speech therapy since August. Anyway my problem is this, Mr E does not understand things like: short/tall, greater than/less than, before/after. It is a skill we have been working on with our outside speech therapist. When I brought up this up with his kindergarten teacher after she has sent home multiple assignments asking the kids what letter comes before/after a certain letter, she replied that “it is very normal for kids his age not to understand” the above examples. I thought Mr E had finally figured out the before/after thing, but this week after getting the first few letters correct, he is struggling and becomes extremely upset.

      Is it age appropriate for him to know the Before/after? Is his teacher bluffing that it is “normal” to not understand before/after?

      • This topic was modified 2 years, 1 month ago by lmcclellan.
    • #100924
      lucybrighton
      Participant

      I am a teacher and I think most kids of the age of 5-6 understand before/after. And it is common in children with ADHD to have trouble understanding before/after, short/tall, greater than/lesser than.

    • #100946
      strwbry
      Participant

      The teacher is right. Those are first grade skills. I wouldn’t be too concerned that he hasn’t grasped the concept yet. It’s at least a year ahead of him developmentally. Sounds like your speech therapist is a little ahead of the game, and when his brain is developmentally ready, it will click.

      But if you do want to challenge your little one now, you can use any group of objects and take turns playing “Which one is bigger?” “Who has more?” and “Who’s next in line?” by lining up toys or animal crackers or anything else. ADHD learners tend to be hands-on learners and have trouble imagining abstract concepts. Plus, any time you can turn learning into a game (and any time he gets a turn to try to challenge you) you’ll have him focused and interested.

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