Swiping/Impulsive Behavior

This topic contains 7 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  deb91 7 months, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #77220

    purnapatelny
    Participant

    My daughter is almost 10 years old and was diagnosed with ADHD last May. She is on Vyvanse 40mg daily and she is bright, smart and very creative.

    My current challenge (aside from mornings and mood regulation) is her impulsive behavior when it comes to things. She is the first of four girls and since before she was diagnosed, she used to take things from her sisters, in school/classmates and hide them (I call it hoarding).

    Recently she has been doing this more, I clean out her backpack daily and find loads of items that are not hers (pencils, pens, clunky items), took her to the store to buy a gift for a friend and later found a lipgloss she placed in her sisters jacket, and at a friends birthday party she took a keepsake picture. If I ask her how she got it, she says that she doesn’t know, or found it on the floor and generally does not have an excuse on how she didn’t do it.

    I am at wits end because this is and will affect her socially (amongst friends) and I am almost afraid to take her places. We have spoken to her continuously but at the end of it, she strongly believes she is innocent. This is very hard as a parent. Trust your child (who has already lost your trust) or trust anyone else.

    Help!! Also, is there an example of any drugs that can help with impulse?

  • #77237

    deb91
    Participant

    This sounds like it could be compulsive behavior. I would suggest having her evaluated for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. It often co-occurs with ADHD. If she didn’t have these behaviors before she started Vyvanse, it could also be the medicine. My son has ADHD-I and has been on Vyvanse since 2nd grade. He is in 8th now and just started 40 mg last year, which was when he started having OCD symptoms. The MD thinks the sx were probably there all along, but they didn’t develop until after we went from 20 to 40. I’m not convinced. Unfortunately they haven’t gone away even after we took him off it.

    Clonidine is supposed to be helpful for impulsive behavior if that is the cause though.

  • #77240

    ADHDmomma
    Keymaster

    My son has done the same thing for a long time β€” collecting and squirreling away stuff he finds on the floor or lying around. He doesn’t take things from stores, fortunately, and it has improved a great deal with age (he doesn’t fill his pockets with rocks and twigs and anything and everything around him anymore). I do agree that it feels more like a compulsion, but we’ve never evaluated for OCD and no doc/therapist has ever suggested it.

    Interestingly, he has started describing his impulsive actions as not having any control over his brain in those moments and then feeling extremely remorseful after. That description does sound more like compulsion that impulsivity, maybe. Something to think more about…

    Intuniv is often used with a stimulant to try to improve impulsivity more. I’ve heard on clonodine/Kapvay being used for this as well (they’re similar medications). Here’s more information and user reviews on both:

    Intuniv

    Kapvay

    Penny
    ADDitude Community Moderator, Author & Mentor on Parenting ADHD, Mom to teen w/ ADHD, LDs, and autism

  • #77242

    purnapatelny
    Participant

    Thank you Penny! We had my daughter on Intuniv (Guanfacine) last year around the holidays when she was on Vyvanse 30mg but she didn’t react well (high emotions, crying, anger, etc.) and we pulled her off quickly (within 2 weeks). I will research the Kapvay in the interim.

    I am afraid her actions will affect her younger sisters (she is the oldest of 4 girls). She also was collecting rocks and twigs and keeping them in her pockets. Her recent collection was pencils. I found over 50 of them in her backpack…none of the ones that were hers πŸ™

    • #77312

      ADHDmomma
      Keymaster

      My son couldn’t tolerate Intuniv (nightmares) or Kapvay (don’t remember specifically what the side effect was, but it was intolerable).

      After reading @deb91‘s reply here yesterday, I read a little more about OCD, as it seems like a possibility for my son (very a-typical OCD). Sadly, SSRI’s are the treatment (as far as medication), and he cannot tolerate any of them (he is extremely sensitive to medications and supplements). πŸ™

      Penny
      ADDitude Community Moderator, Author & Mentor on Parenting ADHD, Mom to teen w/ ADHD, LDs, and autism

  • #77264

    COOKIES123
    Participant

    My son is 18 now and has ADHD, anxiety and Oppositonal defiant disorder, and auditory processing disorder. We been dealing with this since 13,14 of age. He gets so bad and breaks things. He stop going to school more then a year. He is 3 years behind in high school and started this week in a GED program in a college and went 1 day and didn’t go again. He says its too hard no help and over 100 people in class. He needs lot of help mentally, social skills and education. It’s very hard to put him away for help and now he’s 18 he has to voluntary go and for how long then he will be out. He was in for 2 days and they let him go saying he was ok. He is not he needs help. He can’t hold a job because of supervision authority and anxiety getting ready to have to work. Social Security denied his twice saying he is ok to work. He doesn’t want to take any medicine.
    We don’t know what to do.

    • #77311

      ADHDmomma
      Keymaster

      That’s a really tough struggle when he isn’t open to treatment and is an adult. Your options are very limited. It always breaks my heart when people are so anti-medication, when it could really change their lives.

      I would encourage you to post this to a new topic/thread so members will see your questions about a young adult refusing treatment/meds. You’re certainly not the only family to experience it.

      Penny
      ADDitude Community Moderator, Author & Mentor on Parenting ADHD, Mom to teen w/ ADHD, LDs, and autism

  • #77830

    deb91
    Participant

    His diagnoses may qualify him for assistance from your local Office for Vocational Rehabilitation. This is a federal program administered in every state. He can receive vocational evaluation, guidance and counseling, job placement assistance, advocacy,etc. A counselor will work with him on setting educational and job goals.

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