Straight-A student with ADHD?

This topic contains 5 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  Bobbyjames 1 week ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #127466

    Lorena
    Participant

    Hi, I’m a 16 yo girl from Brazil. Until early this year, I had never considered having ADHD. I’m really hyper, I talk too fast, and can’t sit for long without shaking my legs or moving my hands. The reason nobody ever considered it is because I’ve always been top of my class. What the teachers don’t notice is that I daydream on most classes. It looks like I’m paying attention, but I’m actually thinking about random stuff. Also, I learned how to hide my hyperactivity, so people wouldn’t think I was crazy. In fact, I did think I was crazy, since my mother always said that walking around the room wasn’t a normal thing to do. Actually, I only considered ADHD when I read the Percy Jackson series. Everytime he said his symptoms, I was able to relate. I think I get good grades because I’m a fast learner, but I can’t learn by listening to a teacher. I can’t even use a planner for more than 2 weeks without forgetting it. My mother said I don’t have ADHD because she is just like me, but then I remember ADHD is highly genetic lol. Long rant, huh? I just wanted to know if someone is like me.

  • #127475

    ADHDMaddie
    Participant

    I totally understand. I’m 15 and have known since I was a child I was ADHD yet I have straight As (and not from medication, I never used medication for my ADHD). I think my success in school is because of my, as I call it, “selective hyperactivity”. I love school and tend to hyperfocus on homework. Though, in lectures, I often space out so I have to study a lot. I also learned techniques to help that. I hope this helps. YOU AREN’T CRAZY!

  • #127495

    AF18
    Participant

    Hey there from a fellow straight-A student with ADHD 😉 I’m now 27 and completing my PhD, so please know that ADHD has nothing to do with intelligence or how well you do in school. Of course many do struggle, but some of us have either covered up our issues or learned some healthy or unhealthy coping mechanisms. I also loved school, which generally helped with the hyperfocus… I was very forgetful and always daydreaming, but my mum was great (also similar traits!) and let me have odd days off to catch up on projects I had forgotten about or left until the last minute. I also used to carry ALL of my books around otherwise I’d forget them in my locker etc. I really encourage you to read up on ADHD and try to deal with some of its challenges now, as my problems only really started during university when the structure was much looser and organisation landed on me not my parents. But please know that you aren’t crazy or alone with this! You should be proud of yourself for all you have achieved.

  • #127595

    Dr. Eric
    Participant

    That was me until I went to college… and stopped getting A’s.

    However, one thing to consider with not paying attention (not the hyperactivity) is that gifted students are often not engaged with the pace of your regular class.

    https://www.sengifted.org/post/before-referring-a-gifted-child-for-add-adhd-evaluation

  • #141542

    Cjean99
    Participant

    Very interesting! I knew it was possible. High school was very difficult for me. I have ADHD too, (just without the hyperactiveness per say, and had such a hard time concentrating) but I graduated (barely! 😉 )from high school with a 3.5 but that was only because of my tutors. Now that I’m in college, I want to make up for what I could have done in high school. Do any of you having studying tips? Or did you just have to work very hard to make those grades, even with ADHD?

  • #142375

    Bobbyjames
    Participant

    You aren’t crazy at all! I have had straight A’s too all along my school years and I am now holding a steady corporate career and I believe with some success… I am also diagnosed with ADHD but unmedicated.

    Sometimes you can be clever kid and have ADHD at the same time. Having ADHD doesn’t always mean having a hard time with grades but it is more of an internal turmoil.

    Tips would be from me choose a path that will suit your ADHD mind, where you are not in a routine or bored, where you are often challenged and stimulayed cerebralwise! Most important, embrace your creativity and your ability to adapt to different topics very quickly!

    You are on the good path!

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.