Ritalin vs. Dexedrine

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    • #82938
      tobykraus
      Participant

      Hi all. I have a problem to solve, and was wondering whether anyone can help me solve it. I’m currently on Ritalin ( 10mg/day ).
      Productivity-wise, it’s working. It does add anxiety as side-effect, though, which I really don’t like. Now I’ve read on multiple
      occasions that Dexedrine might be suited better for me. That is the premise.

      Now, my psychiatrist does not recommend I switch. Her reasoning: I had a head injury as a child.

      I didn’t challenge her statement, and will have to make an appointment before I can talk to her about it.

      My question is – and I haven’t found anything in that direction: is Dex more habit-forming than Ritalin?
      Are there undesirable side-effects from Dex that there wouldn’t be with Ritalin?

      Can someone help me shed some light on this, please?

      Many thanks! Toby

    • #83068
      sandila
      Participant

      Hi! I’m surprised to hear you are thinking of switching to Dexedrine. I find it to be a more powerful stimulant and for me, it caused a lot more anxiety than Ritalin. I actually had to stop taking it because I had frequent cases of tachycardia (racing heart) which were really uncomfortable. I went off hardcore stimulants for a while, which in retrospect seems like a mistake, and then started taking Ritalin and have not had problems that were at all comparable to the ones I had on Dexedrine.

      Dexedrine is a type of amphetamine. I would not be surprised if it had more addictive potential than Ritalin, particularly in people with ADHD. However, I’m not sure how your doctor connected this to TBI, since both medications have been used to treat people with traumatic brain injuries. If you have noted a tendency toward addiction, then that may be why. However, you should ask your doctor about it. And don’t be hesitant to probe and ask more questions when your doctor says something that is incomplete or doesn’t make sense to you.

      Good luck!

    • #83132
      tobykraus
      Participant

      Thanks for your reply. The majority of reviews I have read and heard ( first-hand ) favour Dex, some slightly, some by quite a margin.
      I have inattentive type ADHD, if that makes a difference. My addiction potential is towards zero, I guess ( never smoked, never “drank”,
      my setup has been one or two alcoholic drinks per month, and that for two decades now or so. Not much before then, either ).

      I’ll check with her, thanks. When reading the Wiki pages ( and others ), I find it quite hard to figure out which one is more dangerous.

      However, the contraindication paragraph for Dex is a lot longer than for Ritalin, which does raise alarm bells for me.

      Many thanks for your input!

    • #83295
      terrymitchell1963
      Participant

      I am on dex too and have never tried Ritalin. I do have inattentive type with anxiety and have only lost my appetite and a few pounds. Icould not function without it every day.

    • #83329
      Penny Williams
      Keymaster

      Every medication affects each individual differently. You will find positive and negative reviews of every ADHD medication, because the effectiveness depends on an individual’s specific neurotransmitter functioning, metabolism, and genetics.

      There are two types of stimulants: amphetamine (Adderall, Vyvanse, Evekeo…) and methylphenidate (Ritalin, Concerta, Quillivant…). Almost everyone does well on one type or the other, but not both. Dexedrine is a dex-amphetamine, so it is a different type than what you’re taking.

      A Patient’s Primer on the Stimulant Medications Used to Treat ADHD

      Also, be sure you’re working with someone who specializes in ADHD, so that you’re working with a clinician that has a lot of experience with ADHD medications. They are prescribed very differently than most other medications.

      Penny
      ADDitude Community Moderator, Parenting ADHD Trainer & Author, Mom to teen w/ ADHD, LDs, and autism

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