Overwhelmed

Tagged: 

Viewing 6 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #39865
      Penny Williams
      Keymaster

      This discussion was originally started by user knitfit in ADDitude’s now-retired community. The ADDitude editors have included it here to encourage more discussion.

      I work in education. The pace of my job is constant. My room is located by the gym, the cafeteria, and abuts the janitors closet. The music room is above me.  Speaking to my administrator about changing the location of my room will not prove fruitful. I will be told that there are no other rooms available. Everyday, the small groups I work with are bothered by the noise, and 60% of my students also suffer from distractibility. I leave right at 3:10 most days and take my work home so I can concentrate on planning. I guess I am just posting this for any suggestions, or ideas on how to improve the situation.

      Thank you.

    • #40957
      Allison Russo
      Keymaster

      This reply was originally posted by user knitfit in ADDitude’s now-retired community.

      I have Adult ADHD, however, only a few close friends at work know this.

    • #40958
      Allison Russo
      Keymaster

      This reply was originally posted by user Trembling in ADDitude’s now-retired community.

      Background noise helps me to feel comfortable. The distractibility in my case isn’t a function of outside influences. My mind is a scrambled t.v. screen without meds. That’s just me, but perhaps the kids in your class experience less interruptions from those noises than you might believe.

      In school as a child, my mind went off on a wild goose chase while doing my best to listen to the teacher without any sounds popping through the walls or ceiling.

    • #40959
      Allison Russo
      Keymaster

      This reply was originally posted by user adhdmomma in ADDitude’s now-retired community.

      Use the needs of your students who are also easily distracted to convince your principal to move your classroom.

      I know no one wants to take work home, but if you’re more productive there in the afternoons, you’re saving yourself time and stress.

      Penny
      ADDconnect Moderator, Author & Mentor on Parenting ADHD, Mom to teen w/ ADHD, LDs, and autism

    • #40961
      Allison Russo
      Keymaster

      This reply was originally posted by user Bob from Cootamundra in ADDitude’s now-retired community.

      I used a portable CD player and ear buds.

      if that didn’t help, I then put on Great Big Bright Yellow Industrial ear muffs.

      That stopped the outside noise, and stopped trivial interruptions as well. Hah

      Moving is best though.

    • #40962
      Allison Russo
      Keymaster

      This reply was originally posted by user knitfit in ADDitude’s now-retired community.

      Thank you all for your suggestions. I appreciate the feedback. Headphones are a good suggestion, just need to find high quality ones that can block out significant noise. I will continue to advocate for my students, for sure. 🍀😊

    • #50221

      I’m sure you have clearly explained the impact of the noises and distractions to your administrator. Maybe you’ve tried these suggestions, but here are my thoughts:

      Invite the administrator into your classroom to observe When it is both rather quiet and when there is lots of noise
      and lots of distractions of noise and activity. Tell that person what exactly to look for to make your point.

      FIND a SOLUTION. Most importantly, do some research for your problem. Is there another teacher willing to switch rooms?
      Is there an unused space, even a large closet that could be a better place for your students? (I taught in a school that
      was short of classroom space and out of necessity a special ed class used a custodian’s closet. No windows, but it was
      quiet. The children were in a quiet space, small, but much better than a hallway and it became a special space for them.)

      Present your issue in a teacher’s meeting, so other teachers understand your problem. They might help find a solution.
      Would one of your students be able to explain to your colleagues why he/she is distracted by all the distractions?

      Perhaps parents of the children could present the problem from their point of view to the administrator or to the staff.

      Don’t give up! You’ve been hired to teach these children with special needs and advocating for them is part of your job.

Viewing 6 reply threads

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.