Medication for women

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    • #40233
      Penny Williams
      Keymaster

      This discussion was originally started by user BonnieAT in ADDitude’s now-retired community. The ADDitude editors have included it here to encourage more discussion.

       

      Hello. I’m fairly new to the ADHD world and brand new here (yay! I found people who ‘get’ me!!).

      I’m just starting this journey and am wondering about meds. Are there any that seem to work better for women than other medications? My doctor is supportive and is very willing to help me but I’d rather not just try each med willy-nilly if I don’t have to. I tried Ritalin briefly a while ago and didn’t feel like it really helped.

      Thank you very much!! Looking forward to some much needed support and direction!

    • #40617
      Devon Frye
      Keymaster

      This reply was originally posted by user Lean~In in ADDitude’s now-retired community.

      Adderall generic seems to work for me. First thing in the AM and again at 4 PM.

      I know this seems wacko. I started taking the afternoon dose after reading numerous articles about this diagnosis. I was extremely interested in the ability to sleep well. Taking it late afternoon allows me to finish up projects, enough so that my brain can check out and get a good night sleep. Taking the second dose from noon to 2, didn’t provide the calm of completion and the true rest I needed.

      Good luck with your path. Be sure to get out and walk. Exercise clears the pathways of the brain too.

    • #40623
      Devon Frye
      Keymaster

      This reply was originally posted by user adhdmomma in ADDitude’s now-retired community.

      ADHD medications and dosages are very individual. The medication that works for you depends on your neurotransmitter needs, genetics, and metabolism. There isn’t any medication that “works best” or is better for women.

      Learn all you can about ADHD medication to make an informed decision.

      There are two types of stimulants: methylphenidate (Ritalin, Concerta, etc) and amphetamine (Vyvanse, Adderall, etc). This article links to a chart of all ADHD meds by type: https://www.additudemag.com/adhd/article/718.html. Most people do well on one type or the other, but not both. It takes trial and error to know what’s right for you, unfortunately.

      Here’s more on ADHD medication:
      https://www.additudemag.com/resource-center/adhd-medications.html

      Penny
      ADDconnect Moderator, Author on Parenting ADHD, Mom to teen boy with ADHD, LDs, and autism

    • #40629
      Devon Frye
      Keymaster

      This reply was originally posted by user yournewaesthetic in ADDitude’s now-retired community.

      I really don’t think medication is a good answer for ADHD. Is it wrong to say that? I believe eating well and exercising regularly is the answer, as well as maybe some coaching. I’ve tried Adderall and, being an anxious person already, I don’t like how I feel on it. Plus I am sensitive and prone to heart palpitations. Chemically Adderall is supposed to be very close to meth. I know that doesn’t mean “equal to,” but there’s got to be some concern about that, right?

    • #40633
      Devon Frye
      Keymaster

      This reply was originally posted by user cgmac in ADDitude’s now-retired community.

      Hello, I have adult ADD, but am not hyper. I am not an active ADDer, I am a sit-around, day-dreaming ADDer with no energy or zip of any kind. I know not everyone responds the same way to treatment, but I keep reading that exercise is “so good” for “us,” but I HATE it. It is TORTURE for me. It is beyond boring, makes me irritable, my sweat actually makes my skin itch to the point of me digging at it — that is part of why I’m irritable while being that bored probably. I’ve NEVER felt energized after I’ve been forced or have forced myself to exercise. I usually want fattening foods that I don’t normally crave, to be left alone and a long nap after a workout, and my nasty after-exercise mood does cause others to avoid me. How can any of that help my ADD or me? I am so confused by these claims, based on my own experiences that it actually angers me now to keep reading that this will help me. I really get no ADD improvement from this activity — not even walking and that is also BORING TORTURE for me and isn’t any better for my mood if I’ve been bored and tortured for 30 minutes. Has anyone else experienced this problem?

    • #40636
      Devon Frye
      Keymaster

      This reply was originally posted by user Lean~In in ADDitude’s now-retired community.

      Hi cgmac, I understand those thoughts of “exercise.” Boy do I!! Anytime I played tennis, after hitting the ball across the net, bing, bing, bing, I was done. Why would I want to keep chasing that ball? I never finished a game. Ever.

      As for the other exercises…I have a dog. I walk her twice a day. I garden. I’m the one at my house to lift 2 cu.ft of soil conditioner or peat moss into my car, out of my car and into the wheelbarrow. I shovel it into the flower beds. I toss the ball for the pup. I hoe the mixture into the flowerbeds. There is always, bending and weeding along the way. Daily.

      No one says exercise needs to be at the gym. I’ve considered purchasing a hand crank ice-cream machine. Thinking that might be considered exercise, with a flavorful treat thereafter? I’ve also put the electric mixer away. Hand-stir home made, thick mixtures of flour and butter. Adding oatmeal to the batter seems to do me in. It’s not easy to get it smooth, but the rewards of hot homemade cookies are multiple.

      On the point of “meth” and Adderall: Read more. Gather information. Try something else. Lower your dose if your heart pumps toooooo fast. Fact: There is something to taking a medication. It works for a great many people.

      If symptoms include anger, resistance, irritability, lateness then something may ease this tendency. Keep doing the research. Find what works best for you. As I wrote above, getting the sleep I needed was incredibly beneficial.

    • #40641
      Devon Frye
      Keymaster

      This reply was originally posted by user Trixie46 in ADDitude’s now-retired community.

      Hi there, I’m 50, diagnosed four years ago with ADHD when my son first got help and I then realized my issue all these years. I’m not an active ADDer, I was a daydreamer, totally disorganized, brain fog, depression, anxiety…the works. Initially I felt ashamed and guilty about going on medication, especially amphetamines (dextroamphetamines)…ashamed because of the stigma still attached to ADHD, and guilty because I felt I was taking the easy way out with medication. Well, that feeling soon dissipated when my life changed…I have grown in leaps! What can i say — using medication has made such a positive impact on my life. It’s true that it’s not a magic pill…I still need help with coping and organizational skills. I am working on correct eating and exercise — walking works for me and I love swimming during summer. Can’t do the gym, tooo boring. I have a break or cut down on the weekend and during holidays from my meds and I do have some good and bad days, but I’ve not regretted medicating as it helps me to keep calm, focus, study and take on management roles when required. We have to find what works for ourselves I guess, and just support each other. And just so you know, I discuss my ADHD — not looking for pity or handouts, but as a way to educate people out there because I’m not ashamed anymore — and that’s the best feeling in the world 🙂

    • #40663
      Devon Frye
      Keymaster

      This reply was originally posted by user cgmac in ADDitude’s now-retired community.

      Hi Lean In, thank you for your reply. I appreciate the suggestions. My comment was more about, does it really help adults focus better the next day or even that day? And HOW? What is it in their ADD brain that is missing from mine for exercise to NOT help me focus? If you miss a day of all that stuff, do you feel different the next day? Like, slower, less organized, more wasting the day away activities than normal? I guess I want to see scientific proof of this phenomenon and know that is isn’t just theory of those people that live and die for exercise and force it upon others as the best way to be healthy. If exercise is the best way for me to be healthy, then I will never be healthy, because I will always itch when I sweat. Doctor can find no reason for it and it has been all my life, my childhood summers were not fun. I forced myself to exercise 25 minutes a day for a week once. I was not ever focused as a result on any of those days. I also was being avoided by my family for being so irritable. I keep reading it, but no one is explaining it in a real way. The why of it. I can’t find any person that can explain to me why exercise helps this condition for some and why it always is one of the first things said about managing this disorder. I do wonder if it because I am not hyper and don’t have excess energy to release. I have very limited energy and after a day at my job (boring, mundane junk work) I am usually exhausted. We just never knew why until the DX was made. I can’t find any information on my theory either — that “inattentive ADD” is not helped by exercise the way hyper ADHD is. I can’t be the only ADDer to have exercise not help. Not with so many of us out there.

      I saw weighted belts for kids and adults online. I refused to spend $100 to “try” one so I made one of my own (I’m a seamstress). I did this because again, I kept reading that it would help adults. It did explain the theory/scientific reasoning behind it online. Not one piece of information about it actually working for adults online after three days of searching that was from an adult user — not an adult provider to an adult. One more reason to make my own. It doesn’t do squat for me. It is the same exact thing you can find online. Six pounds for adults my height and weight and is designed after the online model. This is where a lot of my frustration is coming from — I read this stuff and get no help from it after trying it. I feel very “cursed” — can you tell?

    • #40673
      Devon Frye
      Keymaster

      This reply was originally posted by user LindainDE in ADDitude’s now-retired community.

      Dear cgmac,

      I am new (today) to this group, and am wondering have you ever looked at diet being the cause of the itching? I ask because when we sweat we excrete waste, and maybe something you eat has part that is excreted and is also irritating your skin? Just trying to help!

    • #40680
      Devon Frye
      Keymaster

      This reply was originally posted by user Lean~In in ADDitude’s now-retired community.

      “When kids exercise, the amount and mix of chemicals called neurotransmitters their brain releases change. Neurotransmitters include dopamine, which is involved with attention. The stimulant medicines used to treat ADHD work by increasing the amount of this same chemical in the brain.”

      Exercise for Children With ADHD — WebMD
      http://www.webmd.com/add-adhd/childhood-adhd/exercise-for-children-with-adhd_WebMD

      This is the #1 answer via Google, tonight.

    • #40690
      Devon Frye
      Keymaster

      This reply was originally posted by user kidrn72 in ADDitude’s now-retired community.

      Hello, I’m new here but not new to ADHD. I was diagnosed as a child when there was not a lot of information about it. Being a girl, it was rare for a girl to be diagnosed. I’m 44 years old now. I take Vyvanse in the morning (early), Wellbutrin, Adderall in the afternoon. I work 10-hour days and need to focus and pay attention to details. I have tried them all and yes, there is no one-size-fits-all medication regime. I find diet and exercise to be very helpful as well. For me a low-carb lifestyle works best to help me feel my best.

    • #40703
      Devon Frye
      Keymaster

      This reply was originally posted by user Lean~In in ADDitude’s now-retired community.

      Hey kidrn72, you’re on the right path. Listening to our own bodies, and believing in ourselves, helps so much.

      http://www.chadd.org/Membership/Attention-Magazine/Attention-Magazine-Article.aspx?id=73

      What are your thoughts on this article?

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