Job Career — Is it Really Realistic? Linkedin?

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    • #183193
      BrendaB
      Participant

      Good day Everyone,
      I had a professional job, lost several. Does anyone know at what point do you determine in a professional job setting- with the myriad of software needed to communicate (email, jammer, IM) , do the work itself, track for project management, video conference, time sheet completion, HR required training…etc. At what point does one in middle age who is diagnosed with ADD and learning disorder(who has meds) say—- I cannot do this?? Am I being realistic? I’ve been trying and trying. I have taken jobs that were not professional and hated them- not challenging, low pay and excessive hours; I also do not have funds to start a business.

      Also- LInkedin- any suggestions on how to avoid being on there with so many gaps in employment- given co’s want to see it.What does one say when they ask?

      Thanks

      • This topic was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by BrendaB.
      • This topic was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by BrendaB.
    • #183218
      ADHDinPGH
      Participant

      My best suggestion is to get some ADA accommodations in place. It helps some. Still not fool-proof since our brains really are not optimized for boring office settings, but it has at least helped me make it more manageable. I was able to get the following accommodations: access to private office area (reserved ahead of time) for when I need to really focus, a laptop so I could work remotely as planned ahead with my supervisor, ability to work off hours as appropriate within the office’s workload, all assignments in writing

      Like I said, not a substitute for a more engaging job by any means, but definitely makes it manageable enough for me to not just impulsively quit and lose my benefits and pension. Good luck!

    • #185888
      Lesilotte
      Participant

      I don’t think it’s unrealistic at all. I think you might benefit from seeing a career counselor. Career may not mean “office job” for you. There might be a career where you can be out and about, where movement is part of the day.

      Just an example that won’t apply to you: my little sis (not add) has a job where she is computer tech support for a school system. This is not sitting at a computer all day! This is going into classrooms and plugging stuff in, showing teachers how to use their equipment, setting things up, solving problems that are different each day –helping people.

      This job comes with a pension and great insurance!

      Not saying you are the kind of person who likes to plug stuff in and untangle computer snafu’s but it’s just an example of a job that requires, helping people, less sitting and more creative problem solving.

      A career counselor might be able to help you brainstorm something more suitable that you might actually enjoy! I hope this helps.

    • #185909
      BrendaB
      Participant

      Thanks so much.
      I’m open to other opportunities but 1. Have massive student loans and 2. Most jobs want to see experience in the field for the position. They usually do not recognize that many skills are transferrable. I tried commission retail and loved the interaction but it was commission only – so many times due to the economy or time of year, my check was zero.

    • #185971
      Lesilotte
      Participant

      BrendaB–
      Another thought for you as regards to a career counselor. I have a friend who is one which is why it came to mind. She works for a local college and is available to all students past and present. Perhaps your alma matter has a similar option. It might be worth contacting them to see.

      In case you are worried that they won’t be able to factor in your ADD, it’s worth noting that my friend deals with many students who have aspergers (the notion that students with the are all geniuses is NOT true) and other neuroatypical students.

      Don’t give up hope!

    • #185918
      Dr. Eric
      Participant

      As Dr. Hallowell says, you need to be organized just enough. If you spend more time on your organization system than doing your work, that is a red flag.
      I favor a stripped-down version of the Getting Things Done system (I recommend the audiobook.)

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