How does the % of hereditary ADHD works? [Concerns for the future]

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This topic contains 2 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  quietlylost 1 month, 1 week ago.

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  • #131203

    RomyAkari350
    Participant

    I have no idea how does the genetic factor goes or what porcentage does it takes for ADHD end on more sides of the family since the topic so far I always encounter is about how the parents can pass down the ADHD to their kids but nto how other family menber odds have chances pos pass it down to them.

    I have ADHD since chilhood and I just reccall I had ADHD since a lot of stuff happen in my life that I really forgot I was dealing with it even before but the case here is the moment I did research to undertand this better now as a 19 year old and do something about it.

    I know i wil manage my life somehow but I can’t help but worry about what will happen to my brother, I don’t think he may have ADHD as me tbh, he is younger than me and i know him well but I am worried about his future.
    I have no idea id he will ever marry a woman and decide to have kids or not but if he was planning to in some point in the future my major concern is that how are the odds he may get the genetic factor and his kids may have to deal with ADHD just as me. I am sure is a thing from my parents but I am not sure wich of them is since they both show signs of it a bit and is confusing but in case it runs a bit on the family I would like to know the odds and maybe prepare for the future and help him out if he needs help and I totally will have to deal with ADHD for the rest of my life so if I is pretty much of a posibility I would not mind to start right now even if there may be many year for it to be getting a real thing and maybe warn him ahead.

    Any article or experts wirtten investigation can help to know more about the chances of a relative having can be a factor to just run into the genetics and if the closeness affects the chances would be good to just have a start and at least tell him some of this to take in count and help is he allows me to from there if the case is positive.

    Thanks for your time and hope you don’t mind in case you find this treat silly.

    • This topic was modified 1 month, 4 weeks ago by  RomyAkari350.
  • #131449

    Penny Williams
    Keymaster

    You’re asking a complex genetic question I’m not sure anyone can answer. Here’s what we do know about genetics and ADHD:

    All in the Family? The Genetics of AD/HD

    Penny
    ADDitude Community Moderator, Parenting ADHD Trainer & Author, Mom to teen w/ ADHD, LDs, and autism

    • #132855

      quietlylost
      Participant

      I’ll second the previous reply. In general, though, they say that a person with ADHD has about 50% of their first-degree relatives likely have ADHD. That’s not a pure number though. Not everyone gets it. So, it’s impossible to predict who will develop ADHD and who won’t. Just like with something like a family history of cancer, heart disease, or baldness, not all things are passed on. It’s just important for someone to know that it might be something they want to look for.

      The other thing is to avoid diagnosing other people. While I can tell your worried for your brother and want him to be happy, we can’t predict how it will go. Worrying for the worst means that we’re likely to second guess his choices, push him in ways that aren’t helpful, and ultimately think less of him than he is actually capable of. It’s important to let the people we love make their own choices and their own mistakes. It’s not our job to “fix” or manage things for them.

      And let’s say he does have kids in the future, there’s nothing wrong with having ADHD if one or two or more of them have it. We have to be careful not to stigmatize ADHD. Dr. Hallowell says having ADHD is like being near-sighted. It’s a part of who we are that needs to be managed, but once it is we’re on equal footing as other people. And, if that day comes and your nephews or nieces have ADHD, I’m sure you’ll be around to help share some tips and tricks you’ve learned along the way.

      Bottom line, there’s no way to predict who will get ADHD, and just because you have ADHD doesn’t mean that your family members have to have ADHD.

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