Can my son’s principal do this?

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    • #47151
      Boizsmom
      Participant

      Letter to Parents from this morning:
      Dear families:

      Recently, a small toy called a fidget spinner has made its way into many of our classrooms. They are marketed with the message that they are helpful to students with ADHD, hyperactivity, anxiety, etc. We originally told students that they were acceptable to have in class if used as intended and didn’t distract from their work or that of others. Teachers have traditionally used other types of fidgets for kids with the aforementioned conditions. Unfortunately, these particular fidget spinners are being used as toys, not tools. Additionally, they have caused disagreements, sharing issues, etc., on the playground and in the hallways. So, as of tomorrow, please do not allow your student(s) to bring them to school or on field trips, as they will be confiscated by staff if brought after today.

      If you have any questions or concerns, please contact your child’s teacher or me.

      Peace,

      Heather

    • #50380
      Penny Williams
      Keymaster

      Sure, the principal can do ban whatever she wants from classrooms, within reason of course. If they found the fidget spinners to be a distraction form learning, they kind of have to make that decision.

      Personally, we’ve found that all fidgets are more of a distraction in the classroom for my son, so less than helpful.

      Penny
      ADDitude Community Moderator, Author & Mentor on Parenting ADHD, Mom to teen w/ ADHD, LDs, and autism

      • #50672
        ADHDMom
        Participant

        My daughter has off-the-charts ADHD and anxiety and is struggling in school. I did buy her a fidget spinner and fidget cube but she also keeps a stress ball in her book bag. I bought these tools more for her anxiety than her ADHD though because she is a picker from her anxiety and needs something to keep her hands busy. From an ADHD standpoint, I’m not sure that these help a lot but from an anxiety standpoint, they do seem to help.
        And thank you to ADHDmomma for pointing out that kids with ADHD shouldn’t be told to try harder. They actually are trying but they’re working against their own DNA make-up.

    • #50394
      panthervalley94
      Participant

      As As a special education teacher in an elementary age (2nd grade) inclusion classroom, the spinners are not being used just by kids with ADHD. In fact, more kids without ADHD are bringing them to school and using them inappropriately. The principal’s letter above very accurately describes the situation in my elementary school. I would also agree with mom’s answer above who understands that fidgits often are MORE of a distracting influence , even with kids who have an ADHD diagnosis. Please observe your child at home while doing homework. Is it distracting her/him while doing homework or does it help? That will soon be obvious whether this particular fidget is helpful or just something that’s distracting. If you find that your child’s concentration improves, I’d make a case with your case manager or principal for its use. Truthfully, a child can’t be writing while using these spinners so they are of little value there. During times when a child is supposed to be actively listening, that’s when it could be of value – only if you are sure you’ve tried it at home previously. Teachers WANT to give children all the necessary supports they require. However, it’s up to the parent to be sure it’s truly appropriate for their child. Right now, this fidgit has just become the latest fad and is being purchased by almost every child. So, as you can see, due to its popularity, this spinner has lost its true purpose. Great for the inventor, but not so great for a child who might truly benefit from the spinner’s intended use. Right now, your best bet is to use this spinner at home if you feel it might be helpful during homeqork time.

    • #50509
      jhasselt
      Participant

      My ADHD son (2nd grade) and non-ADHD son (1st grade) both asked for a spinner. I have refused to buy one, because as Penny stated, all fidgets have become distractions for both of my kids. I agree that spinners seem to be used more as a toy than a fidget. I would hate for my ADHD son’s fidget to become a distraction to others in the classroom. Therefore, I’ve asked the teacher to let him chew gum, etc. instead. This keeps his hands (and eyes) free for writing or reading. If you have found it helpful for your child, I would set up time to discuss with the teacher and the principal. Possibly have it added to your IEP or 504 Plan if you have one.

    • #50612
      Pump2Duncan
      Participant

      We cracked and bought all the kids fidget spinners this past weekend, and let me tell ya – they are such a pain in the rear. I’ve had to take them several times already because they are more of a distraction than a helpful tool.

      We didn’t buy them as a tool for our ADHD kiddo though. We bought them as a toy, for home ONLY. All of the kids say that every kid in class has a fidget spinner (probably not EVERY, but there are quite a few), kids do tricks with them – try to show off what they can do with their spinners.

      So while the fidget spinner might have been first marketed to ADHD/ADD kids, it’s certainly taken on a life of its own and I can see why the school has banned them. Our school year is over, but the administration has already said that if the fidget spinner is still popular after summer break they will be treated in the same fashion as cell phones on school grounds.

    • #50618
      sfellers
      Participant

      Our elementary school teacher has banned them as well, for the same reasons outlined in the initial letter posted above. After buying one for my son, it soon became clear it was a fad toy (for home use only). It’s hardly a helpful distraction while trying to do school work because it requires BOTH hands to spin! Plus it makes a whirring NOISE which is disrespectful to the entire class while a teacher is talking!

      • #50626
        veryblessed1
        Participant

        Thank you! Disrespectful to say the least!

    • #50619
      scare
      Participant

      it was never intended for adhd is was made for cerabal palsy and the woman who made it never made much money and recives no profit.

      Having adhd i find them annoying and think all they do is distract you i have jo idea how it is suposed to calm you down apart from the spinning which is the same as going to hypnotist.

      Sorry this is just my opinon not intended to offen.

    • #50621
      mtnbay
      Participant

      I took my son in for some testing and overheard a teacher and principal discussing banning them. I think it’s happening a lot of places. My daughter says practically everyone at her middle school has one.
      I have found it to be a fairly distracting fidget during schoolwork (he’s homeschooled). While we’re watching videos or during “hands off” activities like that, I’ve found a small ball of play dog to be a great fidget that doesn’t take away any focus.
      I do love the fidget spinners for times like car rides, waiting rooms, etc. I have tried to really cut back his use of electronics during those times and fidget spinners have been a surprisingly good help.
      I could see a fidget spinner being useful perhaps during some of the long awards assemblies or things like that at school, or during the bus ride home (although I know they often ban those kind of things on the buss too – my son wasn’t even technically allowed to read a book during the bus ride home). Try contacting the principal to discuss your concerns.

    • #50622
      tdu
      Participant

      Unfortunately, I’ve seen them in the school where I aide. Also, unfortunately, I’ve never seen them used appropriately–by anyone. Always held up, spun, and watched, by more than the spinning kid. Besides, they make a whirring noise. ๐Ÿ™

    • #50623
      veryblessed1
      Participant

      I am an Educator with 14 years of experience and I have ADHD.

      The best thing you can do for your child as help them to accept the fact that they have to TRY HARDER than everyone else! The sooner they accept it the better. You will be doing them a great favor in life.

      As for the spinners – they are a horrible distraction for kids with ADHD and especially for kids without it!

      Any fidget devices should be concealable and not fashionable as far as the latest designs and colors. This distracts me for God’s sake.

      To focus attention deep breathing, positive self-affirmations, try harder attitude and tactics to block out others. I envision myself in a bubble where people can see in but I can’t hear them and don’t want to see them

      Jo

      • This reply was modified 3 years, 6 months ago by veryblessed1.
      • #50652
        Penny Williams
        Keymaster

        I completely disagree with telling kids with ADHD to “try harder.” Kids with ADHD and learning disabilities are already trying very hard at school. “Trying harder” doesn’t change their ADHD (the brain they were born with) and doesn’t provide any strategies or structure to help them with weaknesses. All it really does is deplete their self-esteem, increase their anxiety, and make them feel less than and broken.

        Penny
        ADDitude Community Moderator, Author & Mentor on Parenting ADHD, Mom to teen w/ ADHD, LDs, and autism

    • #50627

      I’m no expert here, but I feel like an object doesn’t cause problems, people do, and that removing the object only differs issues elsewhere. Wouldn’t a collaborative problem-solving approach be more helpful in the long term for all children, specifically if the issues are fighting, sharing, and playing at inappropriate times? And teach actual skills rather than just remove objects, which will only eventually be replaced by another fad. I often feel like these kinds of policies are just going in endless circles around the real issue, in an attempt to set the issue aside for later rather than ever confront it at all.

      My response to this letter would be explaining just that. That’s just me though, and likely why my school would never dare send a letter like this with my children,

      • #50637
        smiths.uk
        Participant

        Thank you for being a voice of sense and compassion in the fog. These issues are not simplistic or binary- which makes them hard to make policy for. The harder and braver road is characterized by compassion, support and a desire to understand and help. Sadly, these previous posts seem to be characterized by lack of kindness and simplistic thinking

    • #50628
      shingle
      Participant

      We bought this as a toy due to its popularity. It’s been very helpful to my son – not in the classroom where it’s banned – but it helps him complete tasks he would normally do painfully slow or too fast. He gives it a spin and brushes his teeth until it stops. Or he tries to get completely dressed before it stops. It works much better than a timer. It’s completely changed our mornings.

      • #50653
        Penny Williams
        Keymaster

        That’s awesome! I love using it as a timer of sorts. Great idea!

        Penny
        ADDitude Community Moderator, Author & Mentor on Parenting ADHD, Mom to teen w/ ADHD, LDs, and autism

    • #50629
      Amie
      Participant

      Yes they can. Luckily for my daughter her school district let’s each School decide for it’s self. As both myself and my husband also are ADD we find the fidget spinner useful for all of us. The “hum” it makes is not loud but soothing. Also, the vibration from the spinner is sensory stimulating. All of us concentrate better if our hands have something to do. The spinner stops my husband from rubbing his fingers together, which is annoying. The spinner comes in handy for my daughter and I when we can’t take our favorite concentration aid – knitting and crocheting – with us, or it’s not appropriate to do so. If a spinner won’t work a piece of chewlery might. It’s worn like a necklace, or a pencil topper and can be chewed on. This is especially good for kiddos who chew on anything and everything.

      • #50632
        Patti Reis
        Participant

        Okay the hum is not loud if you’re in a normally noisy home or car. But they most certainly are noisy in a classroom that’s supposed to be quiet (like when there’s a test), or other quiet settings. I heard several of them going when my daughter’s 6th grade class was giving speeches in their auditorium. And trust me it was distracting. Just some food for though.

      • #50638
        smiths.uk
        Participant

        imagine how distracting it is without the spinner for those for whom it works. `similar to what you are describing- yet they must put up with it? The issue is all kids aren’t the same, what distracts one, helps another, what helps one distracts another. Creative management solutions are required, not preference of one group over another

    • #50631
      Patti Reis
      Participant

      I love this discussion. First, I will just say that if you REALLY think it will be helpful for your kid (and PLEASE watch them use it first, preferably in a classroom setting or at least when they’re trying to complete homework because it may be eye-opening), then consider this: gum is banned in most schools too, but a 504 plan can allow for an individual child to chew it if helps them focus (or, as with my daughter, helps with anxiety and helps her not chew her nails as much). But I agree with all the comments above about this particular gadget not being useful for kids with ADHD – except maybe to help them sit through a long car ride. Just consider all the pieces before you raise a stink about your school allowing them. They are a fad right now and kids want them to play with and because their friends have them but I’m sure they can be quite persuasive about how they need them to help them focus. ๐Ÿ˜‰

    • #50634
      fidgetland
      Participant

      As the owner of one the oldest fidget companies around (over 10 years) I want to say that the fidget spinner has definitely hurt the integrity of fidgeting and fidgets in general, not to mention created confusion in the marketplace. So called “Fidget” Spinners are toys plain and simple. They are not fidgets. They are no more appropriate for the classroom then one of those handheld spinning toys you buy at Disneyland that flash and light up when you press the button. The spinners don’t offer any of the benefits a real fidget offer. A real fidgets job is to keep the part of your brain that gets bored occupied so the other part can focus and pay attention. You can’t focus and pay attention while using a spinner for the mere fact that you’re watching it spin so the focus is on the spinner instead of what you’re supposed to be paying attention to. Real fidgets offer great benefits to their users, trust me, I live it everyday, not only as an ADHD’er but working in this space 24/7. I’ve seen the results and I hear the testimonials daily. I’m happy to read on this thread that a few people have found the spinners beneficial, I think that’s great, but that shouldn’t be confused with spinners being fidgets.

      Fidget Now, Fidget Forever!

      Jason Burns aka “The Fidget Man”
      Pres/CEO Fidgetland

      • #50636
        mtnbay
        Participant

        So what, may I ask, is a “real fidget” then? My son’s occupational therapist put together a bag of fidgets – play dough, a rubbery tube that’s meant to be a pencil grip, a plastic bolt & nut. I don’t think any of these are manufactured for the purpose of being fidgeted with, yet they work well as such.

      • #50691
        fidgetland
        Participant

        Great question mtnbay, fidgets don’t have to be professionally made or manufactured, they just need to serve the need of the user and shouldn’t attract attention from others. I used to use the plastic ring on the top of water bottles, paper clips, clothing labels, pen tops, and empty key rings that I connected to one another, the list goes on and on ๐Ÿ™‚ Glad to hear that the fidgets your OT gave your son are working, that’s the most important thing! Fidget Now, Fidget Forever! Jason aka “The Fidget Man”

      • #51681
        anomalocaris
        Participant

        Jason — please see my earlier comment below, if you missed it. It’s all about you and the Rizzle ๐Ÿ™‚ It was kinda fun to see you show up in the convo after I posted it.

      • #51701
        fidgetland
        Participant

        Thanks for the shoutout and great to hear about your success with the smaller Rizzle. Fidget Now, Fidget Forever! Jason aka “The Fidget Man”

      • #51565
        Dr. Eric
        Participant

        So, I agree with previous post that state that Fidget Spinners are toys and fail as actual fidgets!

        As someone who recommends fidget regularly, I have never found a case where I supported a fidget spinner.
        It almost always fails 2 of my 3 criteria of a good fidget.

        1. It increases attention of the user. Therefore, it cannot be distracting to the user. One they start using it, they almost forget they are doing it. (Focusing on the tricks that they can do = Fail!)

        2. It is not distracting to classmates. (That sound most of them make = Fail! Classmates checking out the tricks = Fail!)

        3. They are cheap to replace and not damaging to lose. Minimal damage if stolen or used inappropriately.

        So what works, I have seen most of the items mentioned in the previous posts work great for some kids.
        At the end of the day, it is individualized and mostly trial and error.

        Putty, Playdough, therabands, pencil toppers, a doodle sketchbook, and “Tangles” are usually where I recommend starting…

        I have not had much experience with the fidget cube, as they have not gotten as popular as the spinners.
        My first questions is, “Do they make noise?”

    • #50640

      Such an interesting set of comments!
      I always learn from people who have compassion for others.

      As a teacher and a parent who deals with an ADHD at home and at school, I found the fidget spinner helpful for social anxiety but not for thr attention deficiency.

      I have one classroom with 6 students who have all ย extreme behavior issues in the high school. Initially fidget spinner was used inappropriately but giving the students some time to get over the excitement of it for several days, The fidget spinner become a soothing tool in the classroom. It keeps some student busy and calm in the classroom!

      I and My son, who is 6 years old, started to use the fidget spinner as soon as it became popular, the spinner is definitely a distraction if we need to focus on something but it is very soothing when our mind is racing around!

      We actually don’t like the commercial one and we have made at least 15 different models, using legos! We become competitive to see who make the one with the minimum noise and that brought some engineering skill to the house.

      Banning the fidget spinner from school is not a solution but taking it away from student who intentionally distract others is a must!

    • #50648
      mbhorn
      Participant

      Our school has ban the three blade spinners. If you have a cube (only using the quiet buttons) or the rings from Fidgetland are allowed. They have to be small. my children use also use polished rocks and worry/thumb stones for anxiety and ADHD.

      • #50659
        veryblessed1
        Participant

        Polished rocks must get.

      • #51683
        anomalocaris
        Participant

        I actually prefer ones that aren’t polished, because the polished texture makes them less fidgety. raw, unpolished agate is especially nice because the surface has a soapy feel that’s not rough to the touch.

    • #50655
      JCMichener
      Participant

      Our school banned all fidget “toys” b/c the reality is all kids were using them as toys, beyond ADD/ADHD using them as an accommodation. The spinners are more of a distraction, without question. However, because it was already written into my son’s plan, he is allowed to continue to use the fidget cube in class. This is a quiet tool he can use one-handed to fidget with (rather than rummaging through his desk) and helps him with attention & focus.

    • #50658
      veryblessed1
      Participant

      Sorry have to opt out of the conversation. Time to focus on work. Back to my bubble so I don’t keep pulling all-nighters…

      Thanks for the great conversations! I know I can I know I can …

      Jo

      “Today you are you! That is truer than true! There is no one alive who is you-er than you!
      You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose.
      The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.”

      • This reply was modified 3 years, 6 months ago by veryblessed1.
    • #50662
      annanursemom
      Participant

      To a certain degree I do agree with “veryblessed1”. There is no actual cure for ADHD. Yes medications may help ease the symptoms, accommodations definitely help and different types of therapy and tools can help. But the ADHD symptoms will always be there in the background. ADHD is something you are born with and will more than likely always will be with you. So to a certain degree it’s better to understand early on that you are going to have to try harder than someone without ADHD. And it’s imperative that you understand why. I think “veryblessed1” is trying to say that in the real world accommodations, distracting fidgets, extra time to complete projects/activities etc are not always available. And that any child or adult is going to eventually have to realize that they are going to have to “work harder” than those without the disorder…..period…..It stinks and being an adult who has always had to “try harder” and try to fit in I totally get it. The real world can be a tough place for ADHD people. It’s just the reality of it. Diabetics can’t eat sugary candy or cake at birthday parties for example. People with bad eyesight have to wear glasses. It’s just the way it is.

    • #50663
      Patti Reis
      Participant

      But see, diabetics CAN avoid candies and cakes. And people with ADHD CAN avoid situations and jobs, etc. that are too hard for our ADHD minds to deal with. We accommodate ourselves by choosing jobs that suit us, avoiding those that don’t work, and maybe taking on less than we’d really like to do to make sure that what we do handle is actually done. And school is an environment that is NOT well suited to the ADHD brain, unfortunately. So if we can make it a little easier for our kiddos to navigate those difficult years that is not coddling. That is trying to even the playing field. Fidgets and accommodations are to the ADHD child what having the whole family eat less sugar would be to the diabetic child. It makes the journey a bit easier.

    • #50667
      annanursemom
      Participant

      Within reason yes, but some of these accommodations and tools are singling these kids out and making them feel “different” and “less than”. I think there is a middle of the road for all of this.

    • #50668
      a.roberts.mft
      Participant

      I was wondering when I would start seeing bans for these things. They are a neat idea in theory, but any time something like this becomes a fad, it becomes a distractions as well.

      My wife bought some other fidget toys for her Sunday School class of 8-year-olds. They are much better – a mesh tube sealed at both ends with a marble inside. It has a texture and quiet movement that is not distracting but keeps hands occupied. I keep one in my pocket to fidget with as I walk, talk, etc.

      Here is a short link to show what I’m referring to on Amazon.com: http://a.co/54PCLVe

      Mesh fidget toys

      I’m not trying to advertise; just sharing. ๐Ÿ˜‰

      • #50669
        a.roberts.mft
        Participant

        Sorry… I didn’t realize the picture would be so big…

      • #50761
        Patti Reis
        Participant

        Yes I love those! I bought a few for my daughter’s 1st grade class this year. Thanks for the link to the 12 pack. Think I’ll donate some to next year’s teachers too. ๐Ÿ™‚

    • #50685
      Pump2Duncan
      Participant

      What an interesting conversation! Here’s how I see it, I completely get why they are being banned. With 3 kids in the backseat of the car all twirling their spinners, the hum was distracting and a little overwhelming. And I can completely see how attempting to teach a class with 30 spinners going would be difficult. That being said, if your child truly finds his/her spinner helpful, then call a meeting and seek to add it as an accommodation on their 504 or IEP.

      I don’t feel having accommodations makes a child feel less then. My son has an accommodation that allows him to journal during lectures. Does this single him out? To a point, since he’s the only one in class with a journal open during that time. But at the end of the lecture, he could pretty much recite what was said even though he was writing all the random thoughts that went through his mind at the same time. Is it an accommodation that he will be able to use in his adulthood? ABSOLUTELY! How many people doodle during a business meeting? I know I do.

      PS – my opinion on fidget spinners might be bias. I woke up this morning to my son sitting in his bedroom doorway staring at his spinner spinning on his fingers. He was supposed to be getting breakfast. LOL. He didn’t make it 10 steps out of his bed.

    • #50710
      a.roberts.mft
      Participant

      An IEP/504 is definitely a very appropriate place to specify this object as a coping mechanism for specific kids. As far as being singled out, that will depend upon multiple factors: what is the reaction from the other kids (supportive vs exclusionary), how is the self-esteem (resilience…?) of the child with the IEP/504, etc.?

    • #50715
      UtahGuy
      Participant

      My quick comment as to whether those of us with ADHD need to try harder:

      I saw somewhere on Facebook recently the saying “Trying harder is not a plan.” I’m in full agreement with that. I’ve tried trying harder, and it doesn’t help.

      But we often need to try differently. That’s not the same.

    • #50759
      Bonita
      Participant

      Do some research. There is no proof that fidget spinners help with ADHD anywhere! It is used to get people to buy them. If they work for your ADHD child, that’s great for you. But, if you think they belong in the classroom, you are obviously not a teacher. They have caused more problems than pokemon cards in schools everywhere. Take it from a teacher that knows. Our school rule is: No toys from home at school. Period! I’ve confiscated too many and sent them home with a note to the parents. Why do parents want to make school more difficult than it already is by giving in to their indulged children and then blaming the teachers/administrators for their childrens’ inappropriate behavior? Instead, raise your expectations. Learn to say no and follow the rules to set an example. Your children are smarter, stronger, and more controlled than you know. Stop underestimating them.

    • #50760
      Bonita
      Participant

      My prior post is for all children, not just ADHD kids.

    • #50766
      artaloft
      Participant

      You can run a mental test and consider all the other things that have been outlawed at school over the years: pogs, finger-skateboards, pokemon cards, tamagochi,hair dyes, hats, bandannas… Nobody wants those anymore!
      The effect of a popular item on a classroom is often indescribably awful. There has to be a better way to share fun things without doing it during class. With the lack of parenting going on today, it’s important to do what we can to support the classroom and teacher to get things done.

    • #50767
      Tetznoid
      Participant

      Don’t forget the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) The item can be an accomadation. District’s don’t get to choose what law they wish to follow. Want extra power to your accomadation request? Get a note from your pediatrician.

      It also meets the definition of assistive technology.

    • #50786
      jpitford
      Participant

      I am our districts BCBA and we recently had this problem at our schools. I was able to solve the problem by writing a Fidget Behavior Plan for students that need one. They are signed by me, along with rules for using the fidget, type of fidget, and then given to the classroom teachers. The students must have this in order to use in class.

      • This reply was modified 3 years, 6 months ago by jpitford.
    • #50807
      cherylrae62
      Participant

      This type of fidget tool is definitely more a toy than something to fidget with. With that being said the Fidget Cube is a much better tool in that your child can use one hand to roll, feel, or click while reading or writing.
      Thank you

    • #50859
      dmvaughn00
      Participant

      As a teacher with ADHD, I can tell you that the letter in the original post is exactly the situation described in my school district. Our school year is finished, but as more of these spinners infiltrated my room, I had no choice but to ban them like I did water bottle flipping and dabbing. It’s hard enough for a neurotypical teacher to teach a class filled with many distractions as it is (i.e. pencil tapping, drumming on desks, tapping feet), but when you have ADHD and you’re trying to teach and 20 out of 25 kids have fidget spinners, it’s dang near impossible. During the last month of school, I spent valuable instructional time telling kids to please put up the spinners before having to re-focus myself on my lesson. I was having to tell the students (same offenders) every single day to put them up until finally, I had to flat out ban them from class.

      What infuriates me even more about these fidget spinners is that kids who do NOT have ADHD try to claim that they have the condition so that they can continue to play with them in class (which doesn’t work in MY class). So fellow teachers on these forums, be on the lookout for students trying to fib and say, “Well I have ADHD, and this helps me focus.” Further issues caused by the fidget spinners have been selling them during all school hours (even attempts to sell in class) and stealing them from one another. We actually had students get into physical altercations over these spinners. So yes, the school district does have the right to ban items that detract from the learning environment because they are causing major disruptions in both the classroom and in relationships between the students themselves.

      • #50860
        Patti Reis
        Participant

        This says it all. They are far more trouble than they are worth.

    • #51576
      anomalocaris
      Participant

      My understanding on the fidget spinners is that they have not been shown to be effective, and I can certainly see how they can be disruptive. I’m in love with the fidgetland.com fidgets which are designed to be discreet. My “Rizzle” fidget from Fidgetland was custom made for me because I really wanted the Rizzle, but because it’s their largest one, I thought it might be too big for my small hands. When I contacted them to ask if they thought it would be too big, they emailed me back in ten minutes saying, “How about we make you a rizzle, but with smaller rings?” I LOVE those guys! No one notices the Rizzle when I’m fidgeting with it, and the slow deliberate inside-out flip motion allows me to focus on lectures and meetings where I’d otherwise get distracted. If I had a fidget spinner, I’d definitely be distracted by it! A little too fun and active to facilitate focus on my work! Maybe your son would like one of the Fidget Land devices?

    • #51665
      Dr. Eric
      Participant

      Child Mind Institute’s video on spinners.

      Dr. David Anderson debunks the claim that fidget spinners help…

      Our very own Dr. David Anderson debunks the claim that fidget spinners help kids focus. "They're a toy. They're not a treatment.""It's always an issue when any company makes a sensational claim about a new product that provides treatment that isn't backed by science for mental illness."Video courtesy of Tech Insiderโ€‹

      Posted by Child Mind Institute on Thursday, June 8, 2017

    • #51696
      Gage
      Participant

      That is not right

    • #51777
      jallen
      Participant

      Yes, absolutely. As a special education teacher, that toy is no more a fidget than a hole in the head.
      A fidget is an object that a child is taught to use as a strategy to maintain focus, not something alternative to focus on. Appropriate fidgets do not put on a show. I prefer a length of therapy band tied to the rear legs of a separate desk and chair to bounce the feet on, a stress ball or balloon filled with sand for a different feel, a long nut and bolt with a felt square to lay it on inside the desk…There are many appropriate options.

    • #52635
      Randy Kulman
      Participant

      Check out my article on ADDitude Magazine https://www.additudemag.com/fidget-spinners-in-school-adhd-kids/ to learn more about this issue. I think that the kids might have the best perspective on whether fidget spinners are actually helpful.

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