Assistive Technology for Auditory Processing Disorder

This topic contains 3 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Robin McEvoy 1 year, 5 months ago.

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  • #54971

    kimjt803
    Participant

    Do you have an assistive technology recommendation for a student who has severe auditory processing disorder? The student will be entering fifth grade and needs help with learning content now and in the future. The parent has been told that audiobooks and other assistive technology will not work for this child.

  • #55014

    Robin McEvoy
    Participant

    It would be helpful to know what type of auditory processing disorder. Is it that the child cannot process sounds well enough to follow language. Is this child so sensitive to surrounding sounds that a classroom is a constant distraction. The standard approaches to auditory processing problems in the classroom include use of an FM system to enhance the teachers voice over other noises. Certainly audiobooks through headphones can also block noise, but if he does not process language well, that may not help. If reading is in place, then written directions may help as the information will then be visual. Standard daily routines can add predictably and reduce novel instructions. I hope that helps a little. There is not much information to go on yet. I do not know why the parents were told assistive technology would not help. I can see situations where audiobooks may not help. Robin McEvoy, Ph.D.

  • #55015

    kimjt803
    Participant

    The child struggles with reading and he does not process language well. Phonemic awareness is a struggle. The school has not provided a researched based reading program. He has a 1:1 for one hour a day, during language arts.

  • #55331

    Robin McEvoy
    Participant

    Sorry for the late reply, the weekend got away from me. It does sound like the reading problems start in language and/or auditory processing weaknesses. If the program developed by his school does not seem to actually meet his needs, you might request an Independent Educational Evaluation. This allows for a second opinion. The cost is covered by the school district, but a specialist can be brought in to evaluate the child’s abilities and the services being provided and make additional recommendations. If he is not progressing in reading, then a different program or intervention is warranted. An educational advocate might be helpful for navigating the situation.

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by  Robin McEvoy.

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