Adult student COVID19

Home Welcome to the ADDitude Forums For Adults Adult student COVID19

Tagged: 

Viewing 2 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #170934
      imjusthuman
      Participant

      I was doing so well, had a perfect routine for my MSc. degree, THEN ALONG CAME COVID-19. I try not to start my sentences with I, because I read somewhere that it’s selfish.
      And that’s where it becomes difficult to share how my feelings.

      Does anyone else hit their head repeatedly when trying to get their message across?

    • #170952
      retrodad
      Participant

      Hello Human,

      The “communication rules” taught in school for a grade vs copywriting and effective communication in the real world are two different things. Music is a perfect example.

      The use of the word “I” can show personal responsibility and yes, it can also come across as “selfish”. Context and history is everything.

      When it comes to your feelings – there are no rules other than just share them with someone ; ]

      What makes you human, unique and desirable, is emotions – not regurgitating someone else’s expectations, opinions or perspective.

      I – hope that helps.

    • #171011
      za1996
      Participant

      Hey!

      I’ve been struggling with something very similar- I’m in my third and final year of study for my BFA (university in England and Wales is only 3 years) and I am going into a masters in September but I feel completely unprepared because of lockdown putting a damper onto my workflow and education. Motivation is a huge problem. These coping mechanisms HAVE helped me however so I hope they can benefit you as well (I’m sure you are doing these already):

      1. If your country’s lockdown allows for it and you are physically able to- Going for a run in the morning (self-medicating myself with a daily rush of dopamine and endorphins) is an amazing remedy for morning cluckiness (this is what I call the feeling of being a headless chicken with a million things on your mind). If not, tons of websites are offering free online exercise classes for people with certain exercise routines, those with physical disabilities, and more. YouTube offers a ton as well! Doing exercise first thing in the morning is rlly good for my ADHD brain and before bed doing some stretching to avoid going on my phone before bed is really beneficial.

      2. DAILY TASKS!!!!! This is something I did at uni to stay focused (1. Research Journal until 12:00; 2-6: paint, etc.). Giving yourself a checklist will give your adhd brain the dopamine rush it needs to get onto your next task. I need a checklist to get things done because I also have dyspraxia which makes me extremely forgetful so I always find it handy to set daily goals for my work.

      3. IF YOU CAN: separate home from work. I’m lucky enough (not bragging bc I’m very grateful) that my mum is letting me use her living room as an art studio while I’m away from uni (my flat is right next to London’s biggest treatment centre and I have a shite immune system)! So what I did was- with the little space, I constructed a room divider so that I would be able to visually block out things (LAUNDRY, WALK THE DOG, CLEAN, etc.). Being able to form physical boundaries for an adhd brain is amazingng for productivity.

      4. Microsoft planner and calendar! Super helpful!

      5. USE A WHITEBOARD I CANNOT STRESS THIS ENOUGH!!!

      6. Omega-3 supplements and magnesium if you can! In the UK, they sell a spray on magnesium oil to take the supplement topically.

      I hope this helps! Know that so many students are in the same boat as you and I salute you because this is extremely tough for students with ADHD and other learning disabilities.

      – An ADHD Capricorn with a penchant for workaholism and distraction

Viewing 2 reply threads

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.