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Free Guide: Organize Everything Today!

Follow the 73 tips in this free downloadable resource — small changes that promise big improvements — to achieve less clutter, fewer hassles, and greater tranquility.

“I’ve always struggled with organization,” says Michael Laskoff, an adult with ADHD. “Back in my student days, school provided me with structure and clear deadlines to keep me on the straight and narrow. When I started working at a job, however, many of those signposts disappeared.”

Can you relate? By the time many adults with ADHD reach adulthood, their houses, finances, and schedules are out of control. Looking at other people in your life and seeing the apparent ease with which they keep everything in order can be painful. You want to take control of life — but you have no idea how.

ADDitude asked Laskoff — now the CEO of an ADHD coaching company — along with seven other ADHD experts what their simplest, most effective organizational tips are. We compiled 73 of our favorites in this free downloadable guide, including:

  • “Capture” areas for the things you use most
  • Fighting the natural ADHD tendency to “overcommit”
  • Learning to be a “people person”
  • And 70 more!

What works for Laskoff ? The KISS (Keep It Simple, Stupid) approach. For him, less is more, and basic is best. Use this guide to figure out what works for you — and start getting your life back on track today!

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  1. I am wondering if I have ADHD. If I am, it certainly came late in life. I am 76 years old and began having a lot of physical problems about 5 years ago and then, I became so disorganized, lose focus too easily and often. Lately, I am suffering more depression and don’t like myself. I have been retired for 15 years fro a nursing career which I loved. And my patients loved me – I still get comments from people, some I don’t remember any more – about the nursing care I gave them or their loved one and how my nursing care helped them during such stressful times. I was the only one on my ICU nursing staff that could get along with hard to deal with patients or families and doctors. (The drawback to that is those families, patients and doctors only wanted to deal with me!) I grew up poor in material things but rich in love.

    I can say that one thing that makes me think I might be ADHD is my 15 y.o. ADHD grandson that my husband and I have raised since he was 2 and a half. I am seeing many of the problems he has in my own life . He is doing well by the way with help from our family and friends and his school staff.

    Well, enuff already from me!! I am planning to get counseling as soon as I can find time!!!

    1. Hi Snow,
      Thank you for your outstanding nursing career and the many years of kind, nurturing care you bestowed upon your patients. It sounds like they were very fond of you! I am not an expert, however ADHD runs in my family. My mom, both children, father, brothers, and I all have been diagnosed with it. Some of us take medication for it, some prefer not to. I take medication and still struggle daily with things such as organization, staying on task, I have no concept of time, I’m always late no matter how hard I try, my attention span is worse than a child’s, and I can’t just sit still. If I do, I will fall asleep. I wish I could help you more, but I’m really afraid to say one way or the other without more symptoms or information about your habits/routine. There are self tests online that you can check (go over the symptoms), and based on your score it will tell you if you either likely have or likely do not have ADHD. You shouldn’t have to put in any personal information to do it, if it asks for that please find another site that doesn’t require your information, (they don’t need your info for you to take a simple survey). But the reason your question caught my eye is because my mom just went through some of the same things you were explaining. She is 63 I believe and post menopausal, but she also has ADHD. She does take medication for her ADHD, but was still having similar symptoms to what you described. After numerous doctor visits, psychiatrist and counselor visits, lots of trial and error medication, nothing was working. I bought her a book about Surviving post menopause, (I don’t remember the name but I can find out and let you know if you’d like), and she soon realized the book was describing all of her symptoms. Her hormones were off! We opted for the all natural progesterone, it’s a natural balance cream that rubs into your skin, and within a few days she was feeling like a new woman! She said that she would have never known or guessed that something so simple could cause so many problems! The doctors never said a word about it. Considering you are a nurse, you may already know all about that kind of stuff, but if I can help someone else like I helped her, it’s well worth trying. I sure hope you figure it out and I hope you get to feeling better and back to normal soon. Please update us if you find out what it is. Best wishes Snow.
      Warm Regards!

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