Ask the Experts

Q: How Can My Child Scale the Friendship Pyramid from Acquaintance to Buddy?

Does your child with ADHD conflate acquaintances with friends? Teach him how to climb the friendship pyramid — from activity partner to buddy — with these specific steps and strategies.

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Ask your question about ADHD in boys here!


Q: “How do you recommend we address our son’s inability to properly decipher social cues from classroom peers or teammates? For example, our son says he is ‘friends’ with his teammates, and he plays with them on the court, but at games I see those teammates do not interact with our son.”

A: “Boys with ADHD have difficulty understanding the different levels of friendship and what is required to work up those levels of friendship. They have a tendency to call classmates or acquaintances ‘friends,’ so we need to help teach them context within relationships. I have created a graphic to help illustrate the work involved in moving up the friendship pyramid. From there, I help them understand how to be more relatable to their peers by…

WATCH THE VIDEO BELOW FOR THE FULL ANSWER

Climbing the Friendship Pyramid with ADHD: Next Steps

1. Watch This Free Webinar: Strategies to Improve Your Child’s Social Skills
2. Download: 14 Ways to Help Your Child with ADHD Make Friends
3. Read This: How to Make Friends: A Guide for Kids with ADHD


Ryan Wexelblatt, LCSW is the facilitator of the ADHD Dude Facebook Group and YouTube channel. Ryan specializes in working with males (ages 5-22) who present with ADHD, anxiety with ADHD, and learning differences; he is the one professional in the United States who specializes in teaching social cognitive skills to boys from a male perspective.

Submit your questions about ADHD in boys here!

Updated on January 16, 2020

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  1. This concept completely blows my mind and I am a 75 yr old ADHDer. Someone you share “feelings” with. Not a chance!
    Are you forgetting rejection sensitivity on steroids. To this day I have hundreds of activity buddies, but not one who fits that description. Made that mistake occasionally with my closest 0f 11 siblings. And even once (what was I thinking) with a psychologist counsellor who like my siblings ridiculed me incessantly.. Sorry not a chance in he🏒🏒 I have enough trouble censoring my urge to blurt out the most ridiculous comments.

    I am sure that it is doable for normals, but unless one lives in a super supportive (not normal) environment the chances for ADHDers are slim.

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