Published on ADDitudeMag.com

Does My Child Have a Learning Disability? Take This Screening Quiz.


If your child continues to struggle academically even with treatment for ADHD, he or she may be one of the 30 to 50 percent of ADHDers who also have a learning disability (LD). The symptoms in this quiz relate primarily to elementary school, which is when LD tends to be identified.


Q1 : Does your child have trouble learning the alphabet, rhyming words, or connecting letters to their sounds?

Your answer :


Q2 : Does your child appear awkward or clumsy, dropping, spilling, or knocking things over?

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Q3 : Does your child make many mistakes when reading aloud, and repeat and pause often?

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Q4 : Does your child have trouble retelling a story in order (what happened first, second, third)?

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Q5 : Does your child not understand what he or she reads?

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Q6 : Does your child have trouble with buttons, hooks, snaps, and zippers? With learning to tie his or her shoes?

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Q7 : Did your child learn language late and have a limited vocabulary?

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Q8 : Does your child have real trouble with spelling, trouble remembering the sounds that letters make, or hearing slight differences between words?

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Q9 : Does your child have trouble understanding humor, puns, comic strips, idioms, and sarcasm?

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Q10 : Does your child struggle to express ideas in writing?

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Q11 : Does your child have difficulty understanding instructions or directions? Following directions?

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Q12 : Does your child have trouble telling time or conceptualizing the passage of time?

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Q13 : Does your child confuse math symbols and misread numbers?

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Q14 : Does your child mispronounce words, or use an incorrect word that sounds similar?

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Q15 : Does your child have trouble organizing what he or she wants to say or being able to think of the word he or she needs when writing or in conversation?

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Q16 : Does your child not follow the social rules of conversation, such as not taking turns, and standing too close to his or her conversation partner?

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Q17 : Does your child not know where to begin a task or how to go on from there?

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Q18 : Does your child have very messy handwriting or hold a pencil awkwardly?

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Your Score
Your elementary school child seems to have some of the signs and symptoms that should prompt an evaluation for a learning disability. Experts recommend that if a child has "unexpected problems or struggles learning to read, write, listen, speak, or do math, then the child may need to be evaluated to see if he or she has a learning disability." Print out the results of this screener to take with you to an education professional.
Your elementary school child seems to have some of the signs and symptoms that should prompt an evaluation for a learning disability. Experts recommend that if a child has "unexpected problems or struggles learning to read, write, listen, speak, or do math, then the child may need to be evaluated to see if he or she has a learning disability." Print out the results of this screener to take with you to an education professional.
Your elementary school child seems to have some of the signs and symptoms that should prompt an evaluation for a learning disability. Experts recommend that if a child has "unexpected problems or struggles learning to read, write, listen, speak, or do math, then the child may need to be evaluated to see if he or she has a learning disability." Print out the results of this screener to take with you to an education professional.
Your elementary school child has few of the signs and symptoms that prompt an evaluation for a learning disability. If you remain concerned nonetheless about his or her academic progress, you may want to consult a learning specialist for evaluation.
Your elementary school child does not seem to have any of the signs and symptoms that should prompt an evaluation for a learning disability. If you remain concerned nonetheless about his or her academic progress, you may want to consult a learning specialist.

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