“I’ve Got ADHD, and I Don’t Need to Be Fixed”

A doctor, psychiatrist, and best-selling author celebrates his, and your, ADHD.
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Positive ADHD Traits

Dale Archer, M.D., this month’s guest blogger, is a medical doctor and a board-certified psychiatrist and distinguished fellow of the American Psychiatric Association. He is the founder of The Institute for Neuropsychiatry in Lake Charles, Louisiana. Dr. Archer is the New York Times best-selling author of Better Than Normal: How What Makes You Different Can Make You Exceptional. His newest book is The ADHD Advantage: What You Thought Was a Diagnosis May Be Your Greatest Strength.

It's time to dispel the misconception that ADHD is an affliction in need of a fix. Even its name, Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, is a double whammy of negative connotations — deficit and disorder — implying that someone who has its typical characteristics is broken and lacking.

But this loaded term is a complete misnomer. To me, ADHD is not strictly a negative.

As a psychiatrist, I’ve seen hundreds of high-functioning and successful patients with the diagnosis. In fact, I’m an ADHDer, and I wouldn’t have it any other way. Leveraged and understood, it can be a huge plus, which is why I wrote The ADHD Advantage, my new book.

We need to recognize that those with the ADHD trait play an important role in our society as innovators, explorers, leaders, and risk-takers. Of course, not everyone with the ADHD diagnosis possesses the same list of traits in equal abundance. But we need them now more than ever to shake things up and challenge the status quo.

Here are my favorite reasons to celebrate yours and my ADHD:

1. You’re a multitasker.

In my clinical observations over the last 27 years, I’ve witnessed firsthand that those with ADHD enjoy multitasking much more than the average person, who tends to get overwhelmed and stressed from juggling tasks. This can be a huge advantage in today’s workplace.

2. You’re a creative thinker.

Better known as non-linear thinking, the ADHDer’s brain is on warp speed, zigzagging from one thought bubble to the next, coming up with original and creative ideas in the process.

Most people find this “thought process” hard to follow, but it makes perfect sense to those with ADHD. Although this mental agility can also translate into distraction, when managed appropriately, it produces exceptional ideas that can change the shape of an industry.

3. You act quickly.

The tendency to act on intuition often gets a bad rap. Most people fear this unpredictable quality and anticipate disastrous consequences. But it can lead to huge rewards when used appropriately and functionally.

The ability to act quickly, without overthinking, enables entrepreneurs and business leaders to make swift decisions and seize opportunities they might have missed.

4. You have high energy.

No surprise here: We ADHDers are often amped up. While this trait, often identified as hyperactivity, can cause disruption in the classroom setting, it doesn’t have to be a problem. The restlessness and inattention often results from being bored with routine. This isn’t a bad thing unless we insist on making a structured life for everyone mandatory.

5. You’re calm under pressure.

ADHDers are remarkably calm in the middle of a maelstrom. That’s when they are in their element. High-stress situations get the dopamine pumping in the brain, which is why ADHDers tend to make great firefighters and ER doctors, as well as brilliant stock-traders and entrepreneurs. The world seems to slow down, as they get into laser-sharp focus, remaining cool, clear-headed, and effective. It’s why I often advise patients with ADHD to set a false deadline for themselves to ratchet up the pressure and get into the zone.

6. You’re a natural athlete.

With so many medal-winning, record-breaking pro athletes and Olympians diagnosed with the condition, there ought to be an ADHD Sports Hall of Fame. For example, Michael Phelps had severe ADHD and struggled in the classroom. Swimming became his salvation.

One fascinating study shows that major league baseball players have twice the incidence of ADHD as the general population. Athleticism helps to reduce the restlessness commonly associated with ADHD, allowing those who play sports to focus and perform better in many other areas of life.

7. You’re the life of the party.

ADHDers tend to be curious and are excited to meet other people. Their yearning for adventure and fun tends to draw others into their orbit. They love being out in the world, bouncing from one conversation to the next.

8. You have an adventurous spirit.

Risk-taking is a common trait of those with ADHD. Another way to put it is that they are life’s explorers, eager to see new places and try new things.

9. You bounce back quickly.

Of course, impulsivity and risk-taking can lead to failure. But ADHDers typically have an uncanny ability to bounce back. This was confirmed by a small but highly significant study of resilience in college students, which showed that those diagnosed with ADHD were more adaptive and resilient.

No matter how many obstacles, disappointments, and catastrophes we face, we ADHDers possess an enduring optimism and ability to bounce back, time and again.

 
 
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