Getting Things Done (GTD) App: Gtdagenda Review

Can the "getting things done" theory of organizing (in app form) help this adult with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD)?
Gadgets & Apps | posted by Steve Etheridge | Friday July 1st - 10:30am
Filed Under: Apps and Applications, Get Things Done, Get Organized at Work, ADHD Products, Deadlines and Procrastination, Organization Tips for ADD Adults

If you have a dream to be the first human to transform entirely into a Muppet, you can keep close tabs on the specifics, including the time elapsed and progress made, so that no excruciating bone-to-foam surgery goes unaccounted for.

Steve Etheridge, ADHD Product Blogger on the "getting things done" app Gtdagenda

In an ongoing "get things done" series on this ADD/ADHD Product Review Blog, I’m going to be testing out digital apps and software that claim to help with task and time management, because structuring my days is often no easier than building a ship in a bottle with my toes.

This week I decided to give Gtdagenda a crack. You’re probably wondering what the geometrical theory of diffraction has to do with task management, but it turns out that GTD is an acronym for getting things done, an organizational game plan created by David Allen (author of the book with the same name). Well, there you have it! And the more you know!

App Overview: According to the Gtdagenda website, the tool lets you use goals, projects, tasks, checklists, schedules, and calendar functions (aren’t these all kind of the same thing?) to help you stay efficient and organized.

The Good: Gtdagenda seems to work best for those with serious ambition and vision. Not only do you organize tasks, but you also set up projects to organize those tasks and overarching goals built out of those projects. If you have a dream to be the first human to transform entirely into a Muppet, you can keep close tabs on the specifics, including the time elapsed and progress made, so that no excruciating bone-to-foam surgery goes unaccounted for. Reminders can be received by e-mail for those who are particularly absentminded, and if by chance one of your goals is to learn a new language, Gtdagenda supports 12 unique tongues.

The Bad: First off, you can’t get much for free on the no-cost plan accessed via a web-based application (see other options below). It only lets you manage five projects and three goals at a time, meaning that unless your life is heartbreakingly uneventful, you’re going to have to fork over some cash. This was the biggest deal-breaker for me. Also, the layout is pretty lackluster and uninspired, which, contrasted with some of the more hospitable color-coded task-management tools I’ve used, hardly makes me eager to utilize Gtdagenda as the ace in my roster. It shouldn’t be a chore to manage your chores, and yet this is more or less the vibe I got from Gtdagenda.

The Grade: C. If you want to make Gtdagenda work its best, it’ll require some extra foresight and money, and I’m guessing most people needing task-management assistance don’t have too much of the former to spare. If you’re confident about where you’re going in life and what you need to be doing -- but, really, who is? -- then by all means, be my guest and give it a whirl.

App Details: Individuals can use Gtdagenda via a web-based application for free with limited access -- for more features and more users, varying rates apply. It is also available as an Android app (for free) and as an iPhone app (for $3.99). Learn more at Gtdagenda.com.

 

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