Get Students in the Game

Every class has inattentive students — so engage them with these fun strategies for making kids more responsive.

Teacher in the classroom, motivating ADHD elementary school students

Teachers always have students in their classrooms who are inattentive. The following four methods increase student participation and response:

1. Use choral responses. Have students read short passages or lines from a textbook in unison. Have the whole class review math facts by asking them to respond to flash cards you hold up, or project on a PowerPoint, at varying rates.

2. Try pre-made response cards. When the teacher poses questions, students select their answer by holding up a pre-printed response card. Teachers can create cards with a few possible answers on it. Students place a clothespin on their answer and hold up the card when cued to do so.

3. Use a dry-erase board. Ask the class a question, pause for thinking time, and have students write their answers on individual dry-erase boards. After the teacher says, "Boards Up," students hold up their boards for the teacher to assess who needs help.

4. "Finger" the correct answer. Teachers pose multiple-choice questions, with the choices written on the board, and signal students to hold up the number of fingers that correspond with the correct answer.

Claim your free digital copy of Success at School and learn how to handle everything from social skills to homework meltdowns. Plus, receive e-mail updates on ADHD and learning disabilities like Dyslexia.

We never share e-mail addresses.


This article appears in the Spring 2013 issue of ADDitude.
SUBSCRIBE TODAY to ensure you don't miss a single issue.


To share your tips on motivating ADHD students, visit the ADHD Educators support group on ADDConnect.


 

What do you think of this article? Share your comments on www.ADDConnect.com, ADDitude's community site. Check out the new ADHD Medication User Reviews and the ADHD Adults Support Group. Your fellow ADDers want to hear from you!

Privacy
 
Copyright © 1998 - 2013 New Hope Media LLC. All rights reserved. Your use of this site is governed by our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.
ADDitude does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. The material on this web site is provided for educational purposes only. See additional information.
New Hope Media, 39 W. 37th Street, 15th Floor, New York, NY 10018