Getting What Works at Work

Have you requested any workplace accommodations at the office — and have they helped your job performance? Here's what readers said.

A man in a shirt and tie holds out a business card that reads, "Success."

I asked, I received, and I excelled at the job.

Kent, New York

ADDitude asked: Have you requested any accommodations at work — and have they helped?

Some ADHDers ask for accommodations at work. Others are afraid that it will derail their career path. ADDitude readers give the pros and cons, and share successes.

> I went through the diagnosis process as a recent college grad. Because I am new to the professional world, I decided to be open with my supervisors about my diagnosis and treatment. I think that openness with them has helped. - Ashley, Massachusetts

> I have asked for accommodations, and my supervisors and coworkers have been helpful and supportive. - Ross, Alberta

> As a teacher, I find asking for accommodations difficult to do. Luckily, I'm able to manage my own classroom, and all of my students benefit from watching me solve everyday challenges. - An ADDitude Reader

> No. I don't know how they would react if I told them I have adult ADD. - Ginger, Missouri

> Yes, I have, but I was rebuffed by my supervisors and boss. They wanted me to make the accommodations for them. Now I'm unemployed. - Jack, Iowa

> I am a full-time college student, and I have requested extended test time and an e-reader instead of textbooks. It has worked out well. - Karen, California

> I am afraid to tell my employers about my disability, even though I know that there are laws that protect my rights. I think that supervisors will find a way to let you go if you inform them, and tell you that it was for a different reason. - Catherine, New Jersey

> Yes, I have asked for accommodations, such as a reduction in my sales goals, and they have helped a lot. - Troi, California

> I've made my own accommodations, and haven't asked for anything. I wear headphones to block out background noise. That really helps. - Megan, Washington, D.C.

> I work for myself, so I create my own accommodations. I have learned to set limits. If I get two hours of work done, I can have 30 minutes to do whatever has been popping into my head during that time. After that, it's back to work for another two hours. I've also learned that earplugs are a godsend, and I use them when my focus is lacking. - Alizon, Virginia

> I secured accommodations by telling my boss exactly how much more work I could get done for her if I had them. - John, New Jersey

> During certain times of the year, I am required to complete large amounts of paperwork. My employer allows me to work later in the evenings, when the office is less busy. - An ADDitude Reader

> After I got accommodations at the office, my work life has been much better. Getting them was a long, difficult process. I review them with my boss from time to time. It is hard to advocate for yourself, but it is worth it. - An ADDitude Reader

> I am too scared to ask. I worry that my coworkers and supervisors would ridicule me. They may use my request against me. - Tom, Ohio

> I asked for accommodations, was turned down, and then I tried plan B. I hired a disabilities attorney to talk with HR and my supervisor. I wound up getting the accommodations I needed. - Johnny, Ohio

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TAGS: Focus at Work, ADHD and the Law, ADHD Career Paths

 

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