Your Best Tips for Making Adult Friends

Readers share their real-world tips for striking up new friendships.

ADHDers use these tips to make friends.

To make friends at work. Hey, you spend eight hours a day with coworkers.

Julie, New Mexico

ADDitude asked, "What's your best tip for making friends?"

I force myself to go up and introduce myself to people, and then I force myself to follow through on the plans I set up with them, instead of canceling at the last minute. -An ADDitude Reader

I strike up a conversation with another parent at the playground or school when I notice their child is as "spirited" as mine. People can almost always relate to the one thing we have in common: kids. I also stay active on social media sites. Even if it's not an in-person friendship, these connections are wonderful. -An ADDitude Reader

If I meet someone I'd like to get to know better, I say something like: "This is an interesting conversation. We should talk more about it some time — maybe over coffee." It’s a statement, not a question. That way the door is open for me to extend an invitation later on. -Herbert, New Jersey

Sharing experiences is my best tip for making friends. When you are passionate about the same interests, you are bound to make friends. -Jodi, North Carolina

I compliment acquaintances, and this seems to lead to friendships. It doesn't matter what the compliment is, just say you like their car, hair, shoes, stroller, and so on. -Tara, Maine

Showing interest in someone and caring about their particular struggles help a lot. Having lunch out or taking a walk is a good way to talk about the burdens of parenting. We usually laugh more than we complain. -Joyce, California

To get involved. Volunteer for and attend school functions and sporting events. Make a note of the faces you see frequently, then introduce yourself. For every one statement the other person makes, be ready to ask two questions. People won't think you are interested in getting to know them unless you show them you are interested in getting to know them. -Claire, Connecticut

Texting works best for me. The conversations are short, sweet, and convenient. As far as meeting new people, I do that through group activities at church or work. -Stephanie, Oregon

I set up gatherings/parties throughout the year for my son, so he can practice his social skills. Halloween, Christmas, Groundhog Day — it doesn't matter. Remind your child to stay in touch with friends via phone, e-mail, or texting. -Gordon, Illinois

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