Published on ADDitudeMag.com

Ambidextrous Children More Likely to Have ADHD

Ambidextrous children are at higher risk for ADHD and learning disorders than right-handed children, new research suggests.

by ADDitude Editors


Ambidextrous children -- or those who favor neither their right hand or left -- are more likely to have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), learning disabilities (such as problems with language and schoolwork,) and other mental health issues than right-handed children, according to a new study cited in Business Week.

Business Week explains that children who were "mixed-handed" were twice as likely as right-handed children to experience difficulties with reading or speech as well as children of the same age. Ambidextrous high-school aged children were more likely to have poor assessment test results.

According to Business Week's reporting, the study authors noted that mixed-handedness could help in diagnose children with ADHD and other mental health issues.

Read more at Business Week


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