Published on ADDitudeMag.com

ADHD More Likely to Affect Movement in Boys

Girls with ADHD are twice as likely to be able to control their movements for their age.


Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appears to affect movement in boys more than it does in girls, according to a new study from Kennedy Krieger Institute and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, published in the November 4, 2008, issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Researchers tested the movement abilities of 132 boys and girls with ADHD and 136 without the disorder. The children were between the ages of seven and 15 years and were tested for how fast and how well they could tap their toes, walk on their heels, maintain balance and keep a steady rhythm during a task compared to scores typical for their age.

The study found that girls with ADHD and the control group of children without ADHD were twice as likely to be able to control their movements for their age compared to boys with ADHD, who showed continued difficulties.

The study authors suggest that the differences in development of movement control are likely because girls' brains mature earlier than boys' brains.

Read more about the study in Neurology.


Copyright © 1998 - 2013 New Hope Media LLC. All rights reserved. Your use of this site is governed by our
Terms of Service (http://www.additudemag.com/adhd/terms.html) and
Privacy Policy (http://www.additudemag.com/adhd/privacy.html).
ADDitude does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. The material on this web site is provided for educational purposes only.
See additional information at http://www.additudemag.com/adhd/disclaimer.html
New Hope Media, 39 W. 37th Street, 15th Floor, New York, NY 10018

Adult ADHD | Parenting ADHD Children | ADHD Treatment | School & Learning Disabilities | About ADHD | ADHD Resources | ADHD Community
Source: ADHD More Likely to Affect Movement in Boys